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Burning Man as the Geography of Transformation

Photo © 2006 Tristan Savatier

Wednesday, September 26
5:30pm check-in; panel begins 5:45pm
After the program join us for a wine and cheese reception in the AIA East Bay office.

Cost: $16.50 AIA Members and employees of chapter member firms; $21 Non-members (Student members free as always–contact the chapter to register).
Click here to register. Please register in advance for accurate reception counts.

Imagine a city of nearly 50,000 that is populated in less than a week; experiences sand storms and extreme temperatures; has almost no money-based commerce (food and alcohol is freely shared and handed out); has no running water; and burns two major structures in the heart of the city–all with little to no bodily crime, major injuries, or food poisoning.

Planners and avid “Burners” David Early, John Steere and Kurt Wallace join AIA East Bay this month to discuss the incredible planning of the momentary metropolis that is known as “Black Rock City.”

David Early, AICP, LEED AP, is a principal at The Planning Center | DC&E. He has over 25 years of experience in planning and design, and has masters’ degrees in both Architecture and City Planning. His work spans diverse fields such as downtown revitalization, transit-oriented development, bicycle planning, greenhouse gas reduction, and agricultural preservation. He is also a longtime “Burner”, participating in Burning Man (BM) for the past 11 years.

John Steere, AICP, MCP/MLA,is an environmental and resource management planner with over 25 years of experience in the public, non-profit, and consulting realms, managing collaborative environmental plans and studies and open space initiatives. He is an expert in watershed planning, environmental compliance and permitting. He has been participating in BM since 2009.

Kurt Wallace did his masters studies in environmental education before becoming a technology consultant for the Ford Motor Company. Along the way he put in extensive miles bike commuting in places as diverse as urban Japan and Martha’s Vineyard. Currently in his third stretch of car-free living, his business, Bikes Make Life Better, provides bicycle transportation consulting to corporations.

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