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Green Building and Integrated Project Delivery

a Small Firm Forum

Thursday, November  6, 2014
Noon-1:30pm
Free AIA Members/$3 Guests. Open to All.

AIA East Bay
1405 Clay St
Oakland, CA
(510) 464-3600

1.5 CES LUs

Ann Edminster will discuss preliminary findings from a project underway by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation’s Green Building Task Force, which she chairs. The Commission for Environmental Cooperation has been charged by its three federal government partners – the US, Mexico, and Canada – with advancing the practice of green building across North America. Creating a guide to adoption of “integrated design and delivery,” or ID2, is one of the ways the CEC has been pursuing this agenda.

“Integrated design” is a term that has been in use in the green building community for at least 10-15 years, possibly longer, and refers to an unconventional approach to building design that engages all the principal design team members early during the design process, working together instead of separately and sequentially. The aim of integrated design is to derive the benefits of the collective knowledge and insights of all the team members in order to achieve a project that is better-integrated and therefore higher-performing from a green building perspective.

Independently and more recently, the term “integrated project delivery” was introduced by members of the AIA California Council working in collaboration with attorney Howard Ashcraft, a partner at HansonBridgett LLP. Howard’s career has a strong focus on improving the construction process to reduce conflicts and achieve better outcomes for all the principal participants in the construction process. One of the mechanisms developed to further this end has been the development of new standard contract forms for pursuit of integrated project delivery. Ashcraft and AIACC consider integrated project delivery to take place only when these contract forms are used. In a more generic sense, however, integrated project delivery is distinguished from integrated design primarily by the explicit inclusion of the construction phase in the team approach to integration – it doesn’t stop with design.

The prime contractor working on the project is Building Green, with assistance from Bill Reed, John Boecker (authors of the main text on integrated design, as well as of the ASTM standard), Howard Ashcraft, Edminster, and others. Edminster will preview the guide for presentation attendees.

About the Presenter:

Ann V. Edminster, M. Arch., founder and managing principal of Design AVEnues LLC, is an expert environmental and net-zero energy design consultant, green building teacher, speaker, and author. She guides project teams in the creation of award winning, high performance residential projects, both single- and multifamily. She was a principal developer of LEED for Homes and in 2009 authored the first book on zero net energy homes, Energy Free: Homes for a Small Planet.

Learning Objectives:

  1. After completing this program participants will understand the use of the guide for green building and integrated project delivery.
  2. After completing this program participants will understand the roles of the respective players in an integrative process.
  3. After completing this program participants will understand how to structure team collaboration to greatest effectiveness.
  4. After completing this program participants will be able to set the groundwork for an integrative design to effect a positive project outcome.

 

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