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Beat the Code: Title 24 Energy Code and Multifamily Buildings

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a California Multi-Family New Homes program

Wednesday, September 9, 2015
Noon-1:30pm
SOLD OUT

1.5 CES/HSW LUs

California regulators have set a policy goal that by 2020 all residential buildings built in California will be designed to “Zero Net Energy” standards. The challenges are substantial, especially for multifamily architects and designers. In this 90-minute learning lunch you will learn what the goal means, how it is being achieved, and how to address challenges specific to multifamily building energy design.

About the presenters:

Gina Rodda is a principal at Gabel Associates. She has been in the energy modeling field since 1991, through the course of seven California building energy code cycles. In addition to providing residential and non-residential energy calculations for a variety of building types throughout California, she leads full day trainings, hosts various webinars and holds the following certifications: Certified Energy Analyst (CEA), Certified Energy Plans Examiner (CEPE) and LEED Accredited Professional (AP).

Matt Christie is a Senior Project Manager with TRC Energy Services working on PG&E’s California Multi-Family New Homes and Multi-Family Upgrade Program. Matt has a depth of experience designing and managing utility incentive programs across the residential market sector, including design of the California Advances Homes Program (CAHP). His program design approach focuses on whole-building energy use and Zero Net Energy initiatives.

Learning objectives:
By the end of this program, attendees will be able to:

1) Explain the goals of California’s Energy Code: Title 24, part 6.
2) Understand the minimum prescriptive requirements in the 2013 Energy Code and how beating them can help with LEED certification and qualifying for tax credits.
3) Identify major components of the building and where it’s easy or impossible to exceed code in multifamily buildings.
4) Employ strategies to enable them to exceed 2013 Energy Code and move towards designing Zero Net Energy buildings.

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