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Building to the Model: A Case Study in Change Management for a Billion Dollar Hospital

EBRUG

a Revit User Group

Tuesday, November 17, 2015
11:30am-1:30pm
Click here to register
Complimentary lunch provided by Ideate, Inc.

1.5 CES LUs

In the AEC industry, 2D drawings are plan checked – not 3D models. What happens then when your drawings are derived from the model, and the model is in a constant state of change and refinement?

In this presentation, we will look to the case study of the CPMC Van Ness and Geary Campus (formerly known as Cathedral Hill Hospital) project in San Francisco, California from inside the structural engineer’s office. We will primarily discuss Revit workflows and tools that have helped this fully IPD project to manage an iterative design process and tight construction schedule. We will also cover Navisworks and Bluebeam as integral tools for information, documentation and change management.

Who Should Attend:
Architects, structural engineers, general contractors, MEP designers and detailers, BIM/VDC managers & specialists.

About the Presenter:
Benjamin Alfonso received his B.A. in Architecture from UC Berkeley and is a Sr. BIM Specialist for Modulus Consulting, a national BIM services firm headquartered in San Francisco, CA. He specializes in structural and architectural modeling in Revit as well as coordination in Navisworks. Mr. Alfonso has worked on projects such as San Francisco General Hospital, Highland Hospital in Oakland, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and processor manufacturing facility, high-rises, corporate offices and for the past year has led the BIM effort for Degenkolb Enginners on CPMC Van Ness and Geary Campus.

Learning Objectives:

1: What happens when your 3D models are derived from 2D drawings and the model is in a constant state of change?

2: Understand a BIM project from a structural engineer’s point of view.

3: Learn how Navisworks  tools integrate with Revit in a billion dollar hospital project.

4: Understand Revit workflows and tools that have helped this fully IPD project to manage an iterative design process and tight construction schedule.

 

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