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How Storytelling Helps Development Past the Finish Line


A Regional Urban Design Forum

Wednesday, October 12, 2016
Free and open to all. Bring your own lunch.


Architects and urban planners are increasingly tasked with not only delivering successful projects to their clients but also getting buyoff from a multitude of stakeholders. Storytelling using video and other media can be a powerful tool to help stakeholders understand and engage with a project’s vision.  SF Urban Film Fest organizers, Derek Levoit and Adam Mayer, AIA will show past examples of how storytelling has successfully been used to build consensus around development projects. They will also explore strategies for crafting a convincing and memorable narrative. Presentations will be followed by audience discussion.

About the Presenters:

Derek Levoit works for BRIDGE Housing as their Portfolio Rehabilitation Manager. He also serves as a Board Member and Treasurer for Transport Oakland, a transportation advocacy group.  He’s been working with the SF Urban Film Festival to encourage civic engagement and city decisions inspired by great storytelling. He holds a Master’s degree in Planning from the University of Southern California and a B.A. in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego.

Adam Mayer, AIA, LEED AP BD+C is an architect with eight years of design experience domestically and abroad, including three years in China. His portfolio covers a wide range of building types with a focus on complex master planning projects and high-density mixed-use developments. He most recently worked at William McDonough + Partners in San Francisco where he was involved in the Recology Zero Waste Facilities Master Plan project, a sustainable manufacturing facility design for a Fortune 500 company and a master plan vision for a new district outside of Beijing. Adam is a graduate of the University of Southern California School of Architecture and is currently based in San Francisco where he sits on several local neighborhood planning committees.

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