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Livable Transit Corridors

A Regional Urban Design Program

Tuesday, February 14, 2017
Noon-1pm
Free and open to all.
RSVP to events@aiaeb.org.

1 CES LU

Designers and planners often talk about livability, but few efforts have defined livability more exactly or recognized its potential to frame land use and transportation decisions.  Please join Christopher Ferrell, Ph.D., and Matthew Taecker, AIA AICP, as they describe research and provide a framework for “livable transit corridors,” where people have easy access to opportunities for improving quality of life and addressing a full spectrum of livability needs.

Chris and Matt will explain how livable transit corridors can better address persons’ basic needs, by moving beyond the geographic limitations of single station areas, such as to provide easy access to health care and other major destinations.  The project’s research and planning approach were developed for the Transportation Research Board, ending in a handbook called  “Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics and Strategies.”  By examining over 350 transit corridors throughout the US, it was discovered that people who live, work or shop in the most livable corridors made four times as many trips without a car compared with the least livable corridors, and make daily trips to 50 percent more destinations within their corridors.

About the Presenters:

Christopher Ferrell, Ph.D, received his doctorate in City and Regional Planning at the University of California at Berkeley, and began his career as a planner for the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC).  In 2010, he started CFA Consultants, which focuses on transportation / land use integration research and planning.

Matthew Taecker, AIA AICP, Principal, Taecker Planning & Design.  For three decades, Matt has been a leader in urban placemaking and transit-oriented development (TOD).  As a planner and designer, Matt shapes policy, masterplans, and implements development near transit.

Learning Objectives:

After this presentation, attendees will be able to…

  1. Identify at least three ways livable transit corridors can better a person’s access to resources such as food and healthcare.
  2. Discuss the findings of the research project “Livable Transit Corridors: Methods, Metrics and Strategies.”
  3. Learn how livable transit corridors cut down on car use.
  4. Identify at least two ways in how people reside in “least livable corridors” and how they differ from how people reside in “most livable corridors.”

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