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Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential/Nonresidential Building Enclosures

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
8:30am-Noon

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary residential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ lowrise residential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to explain which has greater moisture carrying capacity and why: vapor diffusion through materials or air leakage through gaps in the enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a lowrise residential building.

 

Building Science Principles for High Performance Nonresidential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
1-4:30pm

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary nonresidential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ nonresidential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to describe the mechanism of heat loss from the building interior through a concrete slab that extends continuously beyond the building enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a nonresidential building.

 

About the Presenter:

John Straube, Ph.D., P.Eng., is a Principal at RDH Building Science Inc., where he heads forensic investigations and leads research projects in the areas of low-energy building design, building enclosure performance, hygrothermal analysis, and field monitoring of wall assemblies. He is also a prolific writer, a noted public speaker, and a sought-after “performance coach” who helps other building professionals coordinate their efforts and achieve higher levels of performance in their projects. Over the course of his career, Dr. Straube has also been deeply involved in the areas of building enclosure design and whole building performance, as a consultant, researcher, and educator.