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WRLD: CoolTechStuff

Larry Mortimer, AIA

With summer approaching I spent some time the other day looking for architecture related travel apps.  You may recall I did an article on an architectural travel app called “Buildings” back in June 2012.  That app had access to a database of over 40,000 buildings, but alas, it appears to be gone.  On the iOS platform it was probably a victim of the upgrade from 32 bit to 64 bit.  I don’t know what happened to it on the Android platform.  However, the 40,000+ building database is still accessible with your browser at http://openbuildings.com.

I did find several other architectural related travel apps, but most were related to a specific city or location.  One app that did cover most of the world and was available on both iOS and Android was WRLD.

What Does It Do: WRLD is a mapping program that shows major buildings and structures in 3D superimposed on a 2D map.

System Requirements: Mobile devices using iOS or Android operating systems.

What does it cost: It’s free, and does not have any ads.  As for data, they may collect when we use the app, I read their Terms Of Service and Privacy Policy and am not sure how or if they will use any data collected.

How Does it Work: The app interface is fairly simple.  When zoomed out it looks a bit like Google Earth.  There are five buttons.  A magnifying glass will take you to predetermined locations (such as a major city) or allow you to search for a specific type of location (such as tourist info).  The settings button allows you to set the season and time of day, and get info about the developer.  The bottom left hand button allows you to flatten the 3D buildings or show them in full height.  A compass button shows the orientation of your mobile device, and allows you to return to your current location.  The fifth button allow you to place a marker pin so you can easily return to a specific location.  To move the view, just swipe with one finger in any direction.  To rotate the view, twist with two fingers.  To zoom in or out, simply pinch or expand two fingers.  A few buildings have a symbol of an open door.  Tapping the symbol will take you to a graphic view of the building interior where you can move around, change levels, or exit.

Conclusion: This is a fun app to use with a fairly intuitive interface.  Kids will find this app a great way to explore an unfamiliar city and will love the animated cars, trains and planes that show up in certain views.  I could see using this app to scope out a visit to an unfamiliar urban area.  However once you get outside of the major metropolitan areas there is not much to look at.  For example I tried to find 3D views of the Mackinac Bridge and the Taj Mahal without any luck.

More Info:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/wrld-app/id858600575?mt=8

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.eegeo.recce&hl=en

Gyroscope: Firm Profile

Gyroscope is a multi-disciplinary design studio founded on the simple idea that design matters. Led by four owners, our work across the country ranges from planning and designing a new start-up museum in Pennsylvania to expanding a children’s art museum in Arizona. We approach every project as a learning environment to support, promote, and encourage meaningful learning behaviors through good design.Most of our projects are for museums, yet this year we opened a Center for Excellence for Morgan Advanced Materials in Hayward, a new maker space for Woodland Public Library, completed a comprehensive master plan for San Mateo County Libraries, and designed an interactive literacy based children’s museum for Rancho Cucamonga Public Library. This May, the Oakland Public Library will reveal an electric mobile library we designed. Stay tuned for the big reveal. Click here for details.

If you haven’t noticed in your own work, maker spaces are the all rage in ours. Similar to high school home economics and wood shop of years past, maker spaces include desktop CNC routers, laser cutters, 3D printers, computerized sewing machines with technology throughout. What is different are the diverse uses such as drop-in activities, informal programs, classes, demonstrations and/or corporate rental space for participants ranging in age from early childhood to seniors. Gyroscope was architect of record for building renovations as well as for interior fit-out, custom furniture and graphic design for Woodland’s Square One Maker Space.

Three blocks from our studio is the Jack London Square Amtrak station so taking the train back and forth to Santa Barbara while working on MOXI, the Wolf Museum of Exploration and Innovation was great fun.  Fodors ranked it number six of the top ten new museums in the country for 2017. Although not an architectural award, it recognizes the high level of visitor satisfaction for which we are incredibly proud. Our work focused on visitor experience planning, exhibition design and graphics. Click here for details.

One of the most photographed exhibits there is our White Water interactive installation featured on the roof with views to the ocean and mountains. It is a spectacular setting and lots of fun for all ages, although a very challenging design. For projects like these, we are lucky to get private tours of amazing companies such as FLIR, a local Santa Barbara company that makes high-end infrared equipment for both military and civilian uses. We incorporated their equipment on the roof for families to view heat prints of the buildings along State Street. Other incredible field trips took us to a maglev engineering research group, a tele-medicine robot manufacturer, a renewable energy start-up harvesting ocean waves, and a working Foley Studio at Fox Studios.

People always ask us what we do. It’s hard to describe, but we definitely have fun. Staff loves that it is different every day. Tim Phillips, one of the owners, is shown washing out 96 cans of chopped tomatoes for a prototype. The final installation is slated for a new building in Jack London Square. Check it out!

For more information, contact Maeryta A. Medrano, AIA, LEED AP at maeryta@gyroscopeinc.com
Gyroscope Founder & President, 283 4th Street; Suite 201; Oakland, CA 94607

Design Tour: Bishop O’Dowd High School

Saturday, May 19, 2018
10-11:30am
$5 Members / $10 Nonmembers
Click here to register.

1.5 CES LUs

Interested in seeing an educational building set in an ecological restoration of a once abandoned hillside? Susi Marzuola, AIA of Siegel & Strain Architects leads a tour of this Zero Net Energy site. Bishop O’Dowd Center for Environmental Studies was the 2017 AIA East Bay COTE Sustainable Design Honorable Mention winner.

The Center for Environmental Studies (CES) at Bishop O’Dowd High School in Oakland serves the school’s environmental science curriculum while offering learning and gathering spaces for the campus community.The building’s two large laboratory classrooms expand onto a generous covered patio – a third classroom – overlooking the Living Lab, Oakland and the Bay.

Gordon Huether Studio: Allied Member Profile

Gordon Huether Studio was founded in 1987 and has created large-scale, site-specific public art installations for universities, hospitals, recreation centers, civic buildings, libraries, museums, airports, transportation centers, parking garages and private corporations throughout the Bay Area and the world. Effective collaboration with architects, design teams, project stakeholders and developers is a central component of GHS’s success. Recent installations in the Bay Area include the BART Coliseum Station in Oakland, wall installations for the downtown parking structure in Morgan Hill and Mariposa Plaza in Fresno.  A team of project managers, administrators, highly skilled fabricators and technicians support the process from initial design development through final installation. The studio is located in a 15,000 square foot facility in Napa and visitors are welcome.

Artist Gordon Huether, Allied Member uses a wide variety of materials, approaches and applications in his art practice. Whether fabricated with glass, metal, fabric or synthetic materials, or architecturally integrated, sculptural or suspended, each installation is an expression of the qualities and character of the site and an engagement with those who experience the space. A seven-term member of the City of Napa’s Planning Commission, Gordon has consulted with numerous civic entities on the integration of public art into public and private spaces. He is frequently asked to speak on the topic of Public Art and is recognized as an expert on the integration of public art in airport settings. GHS is currently collaborating with the Salt Lake City Department of Airports on a multi-million dollar art installation for the Terminal Redevelopment Program, with an expected installation date of 2020.

San Benito High School Visual Arts and Performing Arts: Project Profile

The design and construction of the new San Benito High School Visual Arts and Performing Arts (VAPA) building started with a school district’s interest in receiving a turn-key project through a design-build project delivery.  Based on the design criteria, Byrens Kim Design Works, in collaboration with Jeff Luchetti Modular Construction pursued the project with intent of delivering a high performing, contemporary classroom building in the historic context of the city of Hollister.  The design concept during the project pursuit was carefully coordinated between the building and the design team to deliver a value-added project from the inception.

The concept arose from a review of the historic high school building located at the site.  Various design elements, including a new tower, arched elements and materials, were carefully considered to work within the project parameter.

The scope elements included six classrooms, a ceramics studio, art studios and a dance studio.  Implementing contemporary technology and sustainable building strategies into historic context proved to be a challenge.

The building was design to utilize a single loaded corridor which provided maximum daylight and natural ventilation. High windows were incorporated to provide optimal lighting for classrooms and studios.   The mechanical system was decentralized to promote individual control and reduce energy-use waste.  Building materials, including the tiled roof and polymer modified cement plaster were utilized to provide minimum maintenance while keeping with the context of the site.

The project was completed within two years from design-build proposal to construction completion.  Success of the project is attributed to the collaboration of the client, the building and the design team.

Design-Build Architect:  Byrens Kim Design Works
Contractor: JL Modular
Structural: Structural Design Group
Mech/Plumbing: TEP Engineering, Inc.
Electrical: Brokaw Design
Energy: Guttmann & Blaevoet
Photographer: JL Modular

Matt Maneval, AIA: Member Profile

Originally from San Diego, Matt Maneval, AIA grew up surrounded by new construction and development. This early exposure to architecture led him to attend the Summer Exploration of Architecture program for high school students at the University of Southern California. This month long program introduced him to basic concepts of architecture and sketching, and had such a great impact on him that he attended USC’s five year Bachelor of Architecture program and eventually become a Teaching Assistant at the same summer program he attended.

While at USC, Matt studied abroad in Barcelona through a collaborative design studio with Spanish students and also volunteered teaching a creativity class to elementary school students through the USC’s Joint Educational Project. He also interned at HMC Architects, Innovation and Design in Architecture and The Autry National Center, where he worked on a variety of projects from healthcare to museum exhibit design. Matt’s graduate thesis explored the potential of 3D scanning and printing systems as a design tool and was nominated for material and innovation thesis awards.

After graduating from USC in 2015, Matt accepted a position at the Los Angeles architecture firm Modative. He worked on several design-build small-lot subdivision projects where he was involved in all aspects of each project from preliminary site planning to giving neighborhood outreach presentations. In 2016, Matt moved to Oakland where he returned to HMC Architects as a Designer, eventually being promoted to Project Coordinator.

Matt is currently working on Higher Education projects including a physical education complex and a fine arts complex in the East Bay. Apart from project responsibilities, Matt is also involved with HMC’s Designing Futures Foundation and helped coordinate HMC’s participation in charitable events like the LEAP Sandcastle Classic. Matt received his California Architect’s license in early 2018 after taking all licensure exams in one year and is an active contributor to HMC’s licensure committee.

Outside of the office, Matt enjoys playing piano and volunteering as a Big Brother with the Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Bay Area.

Hard Hat Tour: Las Positas Multidisciplinary Academic Building

Friday, May 11, 2018
10-11:30am
3000 Campus Hill Dr, Livermore, CA 94551, USA
Cost: $5 AIA Members/$10 Guests   Click here to register

1.5 CES LUs

Mark Shoeman, AIA of HMC Architects, will lead a special hard hat tour of the multidisciplinary academic building at Las Positas College in Livermore. The 43,000sf, $14.5M classroom building is envisioned to redefine classroom buildings on college campuses, and to create much-needed student-centric spaces at Las Positas College.

Organized on two floors around student gathering spaces and sticky spaces are 12 classrooms, 6 labs, and a 100-seat lecture hall. All the public spaces are organized about a central, flexible student space and glass administrative spaces. The building is designed with a LEED Platinum target, with LED lighting, 15 KVa of photovoltaic panels, battery storage system, daylight lighting controls, and rainwater gardens.

About the speaker:

Mark Schoeman, AIA is a talented designer with more than 30 years of experience in all phases of programming, design, and construction documentation for university and college projects. He is passionate about exploring the boundaries of a design problem while seeing creative solutions to client problems, and his work has received numerous awards. Mark was the Principal Designer for Las Positas College Multi-Disciplinary Academic Building 100.

Mills College: Design Tour

Friday, May 18, 2018
9-10:30am
$5 Members / $10 Nonmembers
Location: 5000 MacArthur Blvd, Oakland

Click here to register.

1.5 CES LUs

Campus architect Karen Fiene, FAIA leads a tour of her favorite designs on the Mills College campus, including historic and ground-breaking buildings. This tour will meet at the front of Mills Hall, at the center of campus.

Mills College, founded in 1852 sits on 135 acres and has a lake and three creeks running through the property. We have about 1 million square feet in 64 buildings, the oldest dating to 1871. Julia Morgan did one of her first projects here, the iconic El Campanil bell tower from 1904. We have four other Julia Morgan buildings including the Margaret Carnegie Library, Alumnae Hall Student Union, Kapiolani Cottage and Alderwood Hall. In 2006 the college embarked on the largest facilities upgrades undertaking in half a century. This work included new student housing, the Betty Irene Moore Natural Sciences Building addition, restoration of the Littlefield Concert Hall and construction of the Lokey Graduate School of Business designed by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Lisser Hall, a dramatic performing arts theater designed by Willis Polk in 1901, is being full renovated to bring the building up to seismic and ADA codes. It will be nearing completion at the end of June.

 

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential/Nonresidential Building Enclosures

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
8:30am-Noon

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary residential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ lowrise residential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to explain which has greater moisture carrying capacity and why: vapor diffusion through materials or air leakage through gaps in the enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a lowrise residential building.

 

Building Science Principles for High Performance Nonresidential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
1-4:30pm

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary nonresidential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ nonresidential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to describe the mechanism of heat loss from the building interior through a concrete slab that extends continuously beyond the building enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a nonresidential building.

 

About the Presenter:

John Straube, Ph.D., P.Eng., is a Principal at RDH Building Science Inc., where he heads forensic investigations and leads research projects in the areas of low-energy building design, building enclosure performance, hygrothermal analysis, and field monitoring of wall assemblies. He is also a prolific writer, a noted public speaker, and a sought-after “performance coach” who helps other building professionals coordinate their efforts and achieve higher levels of performance in their projects. Over the course of his career, Dr. Straube has also been deeply involved in the areas of building enclosure design and whole building performance, as a consultant, researcher, and educator.

Kitchen Design: Vectorworks User Group

Tuesday, May 8, 2018
6-8pm
Free and open to all.     

1.5 CES LUs

Our discussion focuses on kitchen design.  We are pleased that Mark Stech-Novak, notable restaurant design consultant, will be sharing his work with us.  We will also discuss the tools available in Vectorworks and other resources to facilitate designing commercial and residential kitchens.

About the Presenters:

Mark-Stech-Novak, Principal, Mark Stech-Novak Restaurant Consultation Design, is a chef and owner of two renowned San Francisco restaurants, and has over 30 years experience designing restaurants and custom kitchens throughout the world.

Paul Majka, Principal, Paul Majka Architect Inc., is a seasoned professional in Architecture with about 15 years of experience with Vectorworks, and is currently running an architectural practice in San Francisco.

Learning Objectives:

  1. See how others use Vectorworks to design kitchens for their projects.
  2. Learn about some of the important factors that contribute to well-designed kitchens.
  3. Understand what tools are available in Vectorworks for designing kitchens, and how they can be used effectively.
  4. Learn of other resources are available to facilitate the design of kitchens.