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Posts from the ‘Partners’ Category

5-Day Basic CPTED

Monday, August 27 – Friday, August 31, 2018
8am-5pm Daily
Cost: Non-Affiliates $395 / CCPOA $350 / COH Employees $195
Location: City of Hayward Public Library, 888 C Street, Hayward
(near Hayward BART)
Click here to register.

Cities and Counties throughout the country are adopting CPTED ordinances requiring site plan reviews with crime prevention in mind. Law enforcement officers and crime prevention specialists who are specifically trained in CPTED are now working closely with Planners, Architects, City Officials, and Educators to ensure the proper design of structures, schools, and neighborhoods. This program is provided by NICP, Inc.

FEATURING · CPTED Strategies · Design Out Crime · Writing a CPTED Ordinance · Lighting for Safety · Understanding Site Plans · Field Assessments

Learning Objectives:

1. How the design and use of the environment can control human/criminal behavior and reduce the fear of crime
2. How natural access control and natural surveillance decrease the opportunity for crime
3. How different aspects of lighting impact human behavior and other design strategies
4. Participants will work together on a site survey and provide a group presentation of their results using CPTED strategies
5. Learn the advantages of having a CPTED ordinance and how to construct and present one to lawmakers

For Course Description/Agenda/Instructor Information click here.

Make the Connection 2018 Benefiting Homes For Sonoma

Thursday, July 19, 2018
5-8pm
Location: Autodesk Gallery, 1 Market St #200, San Francisco
Cost: $30 + service fees / $40 day-of
Click here to purchase tickets.

About Homes for Sonoma:

One week after the fires disrupted and destroyed parts of our community a small group of designers, architects, builders and community leaders called a meeting to discuss how to help our friends, families and neighbors. With so many displaced residents in the aftermath of the fires, we felt an urgent need— really a duty—to provide a clear, practical, responsible way to rebuild our community in a way that not only served the immediate needs of those who lost their homes, but would also help address the long-term affordable housing situation in Sonoma County.

Our goal in coming together is to provide leadership and direction in our collective journey to rebuild our homes, our communities, and our lives. By putting our plan into action we can provide affordable, high-quality homes to our neighbors who need housing and build a strategy for longterm needs.

About Make the Connection:

Come mingle and enjoy fabulous food and wine. Find out what these professional associations can do for you!  Join us for a fun introduction to FIVE organizations serving the real estate, interior design,  architectural & construction community, and marketing professions in Northern California.

Each year the proceeds from the Make the Connection event benefit a local 501(c)(3) nonprofit in the Architecture, Engineering or Construction industry.

Presented by AIA-SF, AIA East Bay, SMPS, IIDA-NC, & RECON

Enduring Architectural Integrity with Thomas A. Kligerman: Partner Program

Delivering The Winning Pitch: Making the Business Case for ZNE

Presented by New Buildings Institute and AIA East Bay

Tuesday, June 26, 2018
9am-Noon
Free and open to all.
Click here to register.

The zero net energy (ZNE) process can be daunting! Discover how the spark of an idea can ignite buy-in and fire-up key decision makers in the ZNE process. This three-hour session focuses on the business of creating ZNE in California’s K-12 schools and community college campuses. This interactive workshop will highlight the experiences of districts participating in the Proposition 39 ZNE Schools Pilot program including planning, engaging stakeholders, assessment of costs and savings and options to secure
financing. This session will provide an opportunity for school district staff to hone their key messaging skills to effectively “sell” deep energy efficiency and ZE in their district. Decision makers and operators of these Prop 39 Pilot projects will provide real life examples and case studies to assist in replicating similar projects in your own district. Attendees will have the opportunity to hone their key messaging skills to effectively “sell” deep energy efficiency and ZNE in their district to help build consensus among community members and engage all the necessary audiences.

Who should attend: school administrators, construction and operations managers, business officials, community stakeholders, architects, engineers, contractors, and others interested in high performance design and construction are encouraged to attend.

Certified Access Specialist (CASp) Examination Preparation Course

Tuesday, July 16 – Thursday, July 19, 2018
9am-4pm
Cost: $750. Checks only, no credit cards.

Location: Elihu Harris State Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland

To register, please send an email to  support@adapacific.org.
In the email please include the following information:

  • Name
  • Contact information
  • Organization affiliation

This four-day workshop, presented by Pacific ADA Center, will provide a comprehensive review of the relevant knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to successfully pass the examination to become a Certified Access Specialist (CASp) in the state of California. The workshop will provide participants a broad yet detailed synopsis of both state and federal accessibility requirements, as well as an understanding of services rendered by a CASp.

Course benefits:

  • Trainers who know the laws and their importance firsthand.
  • Training in accessibility regulations, standards and codes that will be on the exam, as well as the reasons those regulations, standards and codes exist.
  • Exercises in architectural plans demonstrating accessibility concepts.
  • Sample questions relevant to the open and closed book sections of the exam.
  • AIA credit available for those who sign-in each day, complete the course and receive a certificate of attendance.

If you need an accommodation to participate in the training, please include this information in your registration email. We must receive accommodation requests no later than July 6, 2018.

For more information contact the Pacific ADA Center at 1-800-949-4232 or at email support@adapacific.org / adinfo@adapacific.org

Make the Connection: Call for Sponsors

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Make the Connection event!

Make the Connection is an annual mixer that brings together 400+ Bay Area professionals from the AEC, real estate, and interior design communities for an evening of conversation and cocktails. This year’s event will be held on July 19th, from 5PM – 8PM and is being organized by: AIASF, AIA East Bay, SMPS, IIDA-NC, IFMA-SF and RECON.

We are asking your firm to sponsor a $500 flat rate donation to support this community event and Homes for Sonoma. Each sponsor will be prominently listed on the website and social media channels, on the invitation, and at the event in July. Additionally, cash sponsors receive two complimentary tickets to the event.

Please click here for more details and to view our Sponsorship Form.

AIASF NEXT Conference

Thursday, May 31 – Friday, June 1, 2018
11am
Early Bird (before May 16): $200 ($150 AIAEB Member/$50 Student Allied) /
After May 16: $225 ($175 AIAEB Member/$50 Student Allied)
Thursday Location: California College of the Arts, 1111 8th Street, San Francisco

Friday Location: San Francisco Art Institute, 800 Chestnut Street, San Francisco
Click here to register.

If attending day one and/or day two of the conference, AIA East Bay members can register using either of the promo codes below:
O Full day conference comp code: NEXTdbl_AIAEB
O Thursday OR Friday comp code: NEXTsgl_AIAEB

How can architects and built-environment professionals leverage the global United Nation’s New Urban Agenda for success and relevance at a local level? The 3rd Annual AIASF Next Conference, May 31 + June 1, will focus on how the Bay Area can take a proactive stance to achieve sustainable and equitable growth.

The 2018 NEXT Conference theme seeks to expand dialogue and engagement around the United Nation’s New Urban Agenda – a bold roadmap to promote sustainable, regenerative, and equitable growth in our cities. The conference will concentrate on taking a proactive stance to prepare a blueprint to achieve a happier and healthier world by 2030. For NEXT, the American Institute of Architects, San Francisco (AIASF)  will gather the best minds in the Bay Area building and design community featuring three tracks: Design, Business and Technology.

MAY 31: PRE-CONFERENCE HOUSING SYMPOSIUM

This year’s Housing Symposium will examine the housing crisis as it relates to three basic principles: public needs and desires, policy rules and incentives, professional responses to these forces. Alternatives beyond what is currently thought possible will also be part of the discussion given the existing conditions of public pressures and policy structure.

JUNE 1: DESIGN, BUSINESS, TECHNOLOGY SESSIONS

Presentations focus on how the Bay Area can advance upon NUA’s outlined standards and principles for the planning, construction, development, management, and improvement of urban areas along its five main pillars of implementation: urban policies, urban legislation and regulations, urban planning and design, local economy and municipal finance, and local implementation.

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential/Nonresidential Building Enclosures

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
8:30am-Noon

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary residential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ lowrise residential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to explain which has greater moisture carrying capacity and why: vapor diffusion through materials or air leakage through gaps in the enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a lowrise residential building.

 

Building Science Principles for High Performance Nonresidential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
1-4:30pm

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary nonresidential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ nonresidential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to describe the mechanism of heat loss from the building interior through a concrete slab that extends continuously beyond the building enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a nonresidential building.

 

About the Presenter:

John Straube, Ph.D., P.Eng., is a Principal at RDH Building Science Inc., where he heads forensic investigations and leads research projects in the areas of low-energy building design, building enclosure performance, hygrothermal analysis, and field monitoring of wall assemblies. He is also a prolific writer, a noted public speaker, and a sought-after “performance coach” who helps other building professionals coordinate their efforts and achieve higher levels of performance in their projects. Over the course of his career, Dr. Straube has also been deeply involved in the areas of building enclosure design and whole building performance, as a consultant, researcher, and educator.

Mass Timber Construction: Products, Performance and Design

Thursday, May 17, 2018
9:30am-12:45pm
$20. Lunch Provided by Woodworks.
Click here to register.

2 CES/HSW LUs

Due to their high strength, dimensional stability and positive environmental performance, mass timber building products are quickly becoming materials of choice for sustainably-minded designers. This presentation will provide a detailed look at the variety of mass timber products available, including glue-laminated timber (glulam), cross laminated timber (CLT), nail laminated timber (NLT), heavy timber decking, and other engineered and composite systems. Applications for the use of these products under modern building codes will be discussed, and examples of their use in U.S. projects reviewed. Mass timber’s ability to act as both structure and exposed finish will also be highlighted, as will its performance as part of an assembly, considering design objectives related to structural performance, fire resistance, acoustics, and energy efficiency. Other topics will include detailing and construction best practices, lessons learned from completed projects and trends for the increased use of mass timber products in the future.

Speaker: Janelle Leafblad, Regional Director, WoodWorks

Construction Disasters Symposium 2018

A CSI East Bay / RCI Northern California / AIA East Bay Program

Friday, April 20, 2018
8am-4pm
Cost: Early Bird (before 4/1): $195; After 4/1: $220; After 4/15: $245; Students: $30
Cost includes breakfast and box lunch.
Click here to register.

6 CES HSW LUs

8am- 8:30am: Registration

8:30am- 9:30am
Joe Pinon & Erin Andes, RDH Building Science, Inc.
Learning from Stucco Failures: The Importance of Drainage & How Changes in the Energy
Code are Complicating Stucco Installations

In this presentation, we will explain the building science behind cement plaster and why, due to energy code improvements, it is more difficult for the cement plaster to perform well now than it was in the past. We will use case studies to highlight the significance of controlling water intrusion, air leakage, heat loss, and condensation risk. We will discuss various failure types including cracks, water intrusion, corrosion, and complications caused by continuous insulation. We will also apply the lessons learned and show how to use the concepts of drainage and control layers to improve assemblies and detailing.

9:30am- 10:30am
Chris Nelson, Technical Roof Services
Water Intrusion Damage in a Supercomputer Facility

Damage investigations and subsequent repair recommendations originated from the designers and contractors failure to properly address the detailing and installation challenges, including the inter phase of the roof expansion joints and base of the curtain wall to prevent water intrusion. Furthermore the expected seismic movement was inadequately accommodated and did not provide floor to floor fire protection. The project required extensive interior protection, coordinating with worried computer scientists, cutting and redoing the bottom of the curtain wall, installing a fire blanket lower in the joint, installing a properly shaped and sized expansion joint, providing adequately sized and configured sealant joints, providing functioning weeps, some roof repairs and finally passing the required water tests.

10:30am- 10:55am: Break

10:55am- 11:55am
Dean Larsen & Ivan Chak, Larsen/ Zienkiewicz, Inc.
Lessons Learned in Moisture Related Problems – Three Project Case Studies

The presentation will focus on three separate project case studies where moisture related problems
occurred in the roof, walls, or waterproofing. The first case study involves internal air pressurization, vapor retarder, and air barrier design with respect to roofing and walls. The second case involves hygrothermal performance of an insulated roof on an industrial facility. The third case study reviews exterior expansion joint integration with waterproofing. Each case study will include a review of the failure mechanism, recommendation for repair, and new design.

11:55am- 12:35pm: Lunch Break

12:35pm- 1:35pm
Mike Hilliard, AIA, Hilliard Architects
Accessibility Disasters Will Crush You and Empty Your Errors and Omission Insurance
Policy

Accessibility disasters can crush the lives of alternately enabled people who are denied access to public accommodations or housing. Accessibility disasters will also empty a design professional’s Errors-and omissions insurance policy limits and cost the professional a substantial amount of unpaid time dealing with litigation. The “win-win” solution is for everyone in the construction industry to become aware of the requirements for accessibility so that our built environment becomes more accessible to the alternately enabled. Accessibility regulations and their enforcement are extremely complex. This one hour presentation will give you an understanding of the complexity of both regulations and their enforcement.

1:35pm- 2:35pm
Gary Weaver, Atlas Consulting, Inc.
Death by a Thousand Cuts – Failures in Quality Control and Quality Assurance, Where
Contractors, Owners, and Their Inspectors Don’t Inspect

A review of simple systematic failures on three new construction projects, each valued at more than 50 million dollars and all with disastrous results:
1) Sprayed polyurethane foam and coating.
2) Conventional insulated built-up roofing.
3) Fluid-applied air barriers and metal wall panels.

The specifications on each project failed to provide robust inspection protocols but the Contractors, their Sub- Contractors, and full time compliance with the construction documents, applicable code requirements, manufacturer’s installation independent QA Observers all failed to coordinate in providing guidelines and the industry standards necessary to provide a weather resistant assembly.

2:35pm- 3pm: Break

3pm- 4pm
Phil Dregger, PE, RRC- Pacific Building Consultants
Hurricane Maria – Tips for Investigating Not So Obvious Wind Damage

When a roof covering is hanging off the edge of a building, you don’t need a rocket scientist to tell you that it has been damaged by the wind. But what about a roof that is still in place but has a few holes and funny looking “humps”? Is it wind damaged, and perhaps more importantly how extensive is the wind damage? This presentation will review several roofs in Puerto Rico where wind damage was not so obvious but more extensive than originally thought.

The Program is Sponsored By: