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Posts from the ‘Partners’ Category

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential/Nonresidential Building Enclosures

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
8:30am-Noon

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary residential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ lowrise residential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to explain which has greater moisture carrying capacity and why: vapor diffusion through materials or air leakage through gaps in the enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a lowrise residential building.

 

Building Science Principles for High Performance Nonresidential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
1-4:30pm

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary nonresidential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ nonresidential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to describe the mechanism of heat loss from the building interior through a concrete slab that extends continuously beyond the building enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a nonresidential building.

 

About the Presenter:

John Straube, Ph.D., P.Eng., is a Principal at RDH Building Science Inc., where he heads forensic investigations and leads research projects in the areas of low-energy building design, building enclosure performance, hygrothermal analysis, and field monitoring of wall assemblies. He is also a prolific writer, a noted public speaker, and a sought-after “performance coach” who helps other building professionals coordinate their efforts and achieve higher levels of performance in their projects. Over the course of his career, Dr. Straube has also been deeply involved in the areas of building enclosure design and whole building performance, as a consultant, researcher, and educator.

Mass Timber Construction: Products, Performance and Design

Thursday, May 17, 2018
9:30am-12:45pm
$20. Lunch Provided by Woodworks.
Click here to register.

2 CES/HSW LUs

Due to their high strength, dimensional stability and positive environmental performance, mass timber building products are quickly becoming materials of choice for sustainably-minded designers. This presentation will provide a detailed look at the variety of mass timber products available, including glue-laminated timber (glulam), cross laminated timber (CLT), nail laminated timber (NLT), heavy timber decking, and other engineered and composite systems. Applications for the use of these products under modern building codes will be discussed, and examples of their use in U.S. projects reviewed. Mass timber’s ability to act as both structure and exposed finish will also be highlighted, as will its performance as part of an assembly, considering design objectives related to structural performance, fire resistance, acoustics, and energy efficiency. Other topics will include detailing and construction best practices, lessons learned from completed projects and trends for the increased use of mass timber products in the future.

Speaker: Janelle Leafblad, Regional Director, WoodWorks

Construction Disasters Symposium 2018

A CSI East Bay / RCI Northern California / AIA East Bay Program

Friday, April 20, 2018
8am-4pm
Cost: Early Bird (before 4/1): $195; After 4/1: $220; After 4/15: $245; Students: $30
Cost includes breakfast and box lunch.
Click here to register.

6 CES HSW LUs

8am- 8:30am: Registration

8:30am- 9:30am
Joe Pinon & Erin Andes, RDH Building Science, Inc.
Learning from Stucco Failures: The Importance of Drainage & How Changes in the Energy
Code are Complicating Stucco Installations

In this presentation, we will explain the building science behind cement plaster and why, due to energy code improvements, it is more difficult for the cement plaster to perform well now than it was in the past. We will use case studies to highlight the significance of controlling water intrusion, air leakage, heat loss, and condensation risk. We will discuss various failure types including cracks, water intrusion, corrosion, and complications caused by continuous insulation. We will also apply the lessons learned and show how to use the concepts of drainage and control layers to improve assemblies and detailing.

9:30am- 10:30am
Chris Nelson, Technical Roof Services
Water Intrusion Damage in a Supercomputer Facility

Damage investigations and subsequent repair recommendations originated from the designers and contractors failure to properly address the detailing and installation challenges, including the inter phase of the roof expansion joints and base of the curtain wall to prevent water intrusion. Furthermore the expected seismic movement was inadequately accommodated and did not provide floor to floor fire protection. The project required extensive interior protection, coordinating with worried computer scientists, cutting and redoing the bottom of the curtain wall, installing a fire blanket lower in the joint, installing a properly shaped and sized expansion joint, providing adequately sized and configured sealant joints, providing functioning weeps, some roof repairs and finally passing the required water tests.

10:30am- 10:55am: Break

10:55am- 11:55am
Dean Larsen & Ivan Chak, Larsen/ Zienkiewicz, Inc.
Lessons Learned in Moisture Related Problems – Three Project Case Studies

The presentation will focus on three separate project case studies where moisture related problems
occurred in the roof, walls, or waterproofing. The first case study involves internal air pressurization, vapor retarder, and air barrier design with respect to roofing and walls. The second case involves hygrothermal performance of an insulated roof on an industrial facility. The third case study reviews exterior expansion joint integration with waterproofing. Each case study will include a review of the failure mechanism, recommendation for repair, and new design.

11:55am- 12:35pm: Lunch Break

12:35pm- 1:35pm
Mike Hilliard, AIA, Hilliard Architects
Accessibility Disasters Will Crush You and Empty Your Errors and Omission Insurance
Policy

Accessibility disasters can crush the lives of alternately enabled people who are denied access to public accommodations or housing. Accessibility disasters will also empty a design professional’s Errors-and omissions insurance policy limits and cost the professional a substantial amount of unpaid time dealing with litigation. The “win-win” solution is for everyone in the construction industry to become aware of the requirements for accessibility so that our built environment becomes more accessible to the alternately enabled. Accessibility regulations and their enforcement are extremely complex. This one hour presentation will give you an understanding of the complexity of both regulations and their enforcement.

1:35pm- 2:35pm
Gary Weaver, Atlas Consulting, Inc.
Death by a Thousand Cuts – Failures in Quality Control and Quality Assurance, Where
Contractors, Owners, and Their Inspectors Don’t Inspect

A review of simple systematic failures on three new construction projects, each valued at more than 50 million dollars and all with disastrous results:
1) Sprayed polyurethane foam and coating.
2) Conventional insulated built-up roofing.
3) Fluid-applied air barriers and metal wall panels.

The specifications on each project failed to provide robust inspection protocols but the Contractors, their Sub- Contractors, and full time compliance with the construction documents, applicable code requirements, manufacturer’s installation independent QA Observers all failed to coordinate in providing guidelines and the industry standards necessary to provide a weather resistant assembly.

2:35pm- 3pm: Break

3pm- 4pm
Phil Dregger, PE, RRC- Pacific Building Consultants
Hurricane Maria – Tips for Investigating Not So Obvious Wind Damage

When a roof covering is hanging off the edge of a building, you don’t need a rocket scientist to tell you that it has been damaged by the wind. But what about a roof that is still in place but has a few holes and funny looking “humps”? Is it wind damaged, and perhaps more importantly how extensive is the wind damage? This presentation will review several roofs in Puerto Rico where wind damage was not so obvious but more extensive than originally thought.

The Program is Sponsored By:

Emerging Contractual Issues in the Design & Construction Industry

a Westcon monthly program

Wednesday, March 21, 2018
6:30pm
Location:
Berkeley Yacht Club, 1 Seawall Drive, Berkeley, CA 94710
Register for this meeting

In this presentation, Construction Practice Leader David Ericksen, Severson & Werson, will address the professional service agreement, alternative delivery models, and employee policies. Under the professional service agreement section, David will cover:

  • Confidentiality
  • Ownership of Work Product
    • Conscience Clauses
    • Assumption of Preliminary Site Information
    • Indemnity (post CA 496 and CDP Coverage)
    • Code Compliance
    • Pass Through Clauses

David will also highlight concerns and risks with corresponding contractual and practice solutions.

Rebuild Green Expo

Friday, February 23, 2018
10am-7pm
Location: Santa Rosa Veterans Hall, 1351 Maple Ave., Santa Rosa
Free for the North Bay Fire Communities.

Rebuild Green EXPO is a FREE Event for the North Bay Fire Communities. Join hundreds of green building professionals at the Santa Rosa Veterans Memorial Hall on February 23 for education, information, and networking focused on resilient, affordable, community-centered “green” rebuilding options. You need not have lost a home to learn more about resilient green building options. We encourage all developers, builders, designers, construction workers, and architects — as well as all homeowners — to attend.

Schedule:

Education and Community Meetings: 10-6pm

Public Green Building EXPO: 2-7pm

Lean Happy Hour

A Structured, Agenda-Less Conversation About Your Lean Journey

Wednesday, February 7, 2018
5-7pm
$55 LCI/AIA Member / $75 Non-member
$30 Academics / Free Owners & Students
Click here to register.

Join us for a Lean Happy Hour to learn and support each other in our Lean endeavors! Take part in an open conversation in a safe, small and low-pressure environment about the topics that are relevant to our Lean community. We want to hear about the problems you are solving, the issues you want to solve, and lessons you’ve learned on your Lean Journey. No previous Lean experience is required. Based on our conversation with you, you’ll help us provide more relevant topics for our monthly presentations.

Participants from cross functional roles as designers, constructors, owners, trades partners, and associations propose discussion topics around any subject about which they want to learn – THERE ARE NO IRRELEVANT DISCUSSION TOPICS! Each proposer takes 15 to 30 seconds to pitch their topic, written on a sticky note, to the group. Once all topics have been pitched, voting begins to establish a priority for discussing the topics. Topics are then ordered from highest to lowest votes and examined accordingly. Participants will receive 8 minutes of time to discuss the topic. After 8 minutes there will be a ‘thumbs up/ thumbs down’ to decide whether or not the discussion should continue. Thumbs up equals 4 more minutes on the clock. This happens until it is agreed that the topic has been discussed to satisfaction. Takeaways are considered and then the topic with the next largest number of votes is addressed.

Come as you are and be ready to learn.

The Presenters:

  • Steve Yots is Director of Construction Operations with Boldt Company.
  • Dave Hagan is Director of Process Development with Boldt Company.
  • Matthew Boersma is Senior Project Manager with Boldt Company.
  • Ariana Alvear is Senior Project Engineer with Boldt Company.

Finding the Leak Without Opening the Wall

Wednesday, February 21, 2018
6:15-9pm
$50 Westcon Member / $60 Westcon Non-member
Location: Berkeley Yacht Club, 1 Seawall Drive, Berkeley
Click here to register.

Opening wall and ceiling finishes are common when trying to search for a water leak. This type of destructive testing often causes disruptions, requires advanced planning and coordination and leaves the building aesthetically displeasing or more vulnerable to additional leakage.

The use of thermal imaging cameras is a tremendous advancement in the area of investigative leak causation documentation. With thermal imaging, we are able to “see” in the infrared what we cannot see in the visible.

Bill Weber of Richard Avelar & Associates will take you through some basic science of infrared and how it works for this application. He will also present case studies of projects where the use of thermal imaging was a quick, non-destructive and non-intrusive means of determining the source area of the water intrusion leak.

In addition, Mr. Weber will discuss the advantages of the photos and science in construction defect litigation work. You will also have an opportunity to use a thermal imaging camera during the session.

About the Speaker:

Bill Weber is a Senior Consultant for Richard Avelar & Associates; Northern California’s architectural, construction and building code experts who specialize in the forensic analysis, design and repair of commercial properties and single and multi-family residential buildings. He was most recently on the Western Chapter Board of Directors for Disaster Kleenup International, a national Cleaning and Restoration Association, and is also a founding member of the Building Science Institute.

Weber is one of only several hundred people in the country to earn the coveted Certified Restorer designation from the Restoration Industry Association. He is also a Board Certified Microbial Remediation Supervisor (CMRS) and earned his Certified Building Science Thermographer (CBST) credentials from the Infrared Training Center.

If you have any questions please contact Westcon at (707) 792-1323.

Learning Objectives:

  • Gain a better understanding of the science behind thermography and the infrared spectrum.
  • Gain a better understanding of how thermal imaging can be one of the most important tools to discover the location of leaks and other thermal anomalies.
  • Gain a better understanding about the use of the acquired data and its role in litigation or potential litigation work.

New Legislation Affecting Construction Professionals in 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018
6:15-9pm
$50 Westcon Member / $60 Westcon Non-member
Location: Berkeley Yacht Club, 1 Seawall Drive, Berkeley
Click here to register.

This presentation is a summary of significant new legislation taking effect in 2018 which affects construction professionals. The lobbying forces for and against the new legislation will also be discussed at this Westcon program.

About the Presenter:

Richard Bauman, AIA is an attorney in San Francisco who represents design professionals, contractors, and materials suppliers in contract negotiations, construction defect cases and collection matters. He received his law degree from UC Berkeley in 1980, and is a member of Westcon.

If you have any questions please contact Westcon at (707) 792-1323.

Rain Screen Wall Systems

Wednesday, November 8, 2017
11am-1pm

Free and open to all. Space is limited.
Click here to register.

1.5 CES/HSW LUs

Among the most popular building enclosure choices are rain screen walls and systems.  This program investigates the building science and evolution of wall theory from mass walls to drainage and cavity walls finally to both pressurized and non-pressurized rain screen systems.  The attendee then learns specific details of common terra cotta, porcelain and composite panel systems operating as a rain screen. Sponsored by the International Masonry Institute

Presenter:  David Sovinski, National Director of Technical Services, International Masonry Institute

David began his masonry career over thirty years ago, and has held positions in project management, estimating and field supervision.  He managed masonry projects in New York City, Houston, Dallas and Chicago before moving to the International Masonry Institute (IMI).

Designing Modern Wood Schools: A Guide for Architects and Structural Engineers

Thursday, October 26, 2017
9am-12:45pm
$20, Lunch Provided by Woodworks

Click here to register. Space is limited.

2 CES/HSW LUs

This course is intended for architects and structural engineers who are seeking a full system understanding of the unique design considerations associated with wood-frame schools. Architectural design and detailing topics specific to school performance criteria such as durability, fire and life safety, and allowable building size will be discussed. Schools space planning needs will be highlighted as will construction type selection and opportunities for wood use. Structural design steps, considerations, and detailing best practices related to gravity and lateral analysis of common school configurations such as classroom floor design and corridor wall framing will also be covered, along with options for wood-frame tall walls and long-span roofs in open areas such as gyms. With an emphasis on budget, this course will present designers with the information necessary to utilize wood framing as a cost savings tool.

Speaker: Janelle Leafblad, PE, Regional Director, WoodWorks