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Posts tagged ‘IDP’

Path to Licensure

Monday, July 17, 2017
6pm
Free and open to all. RSVP to events@aiaeb.org.

Want to get licensed, but not sure how to get started? Confused about IDP/AXP/ARE/CAB/NCARB? Have all the recent changes in the process left you flummoxed? Come to AIA East Bay for a presentation on the Path to Licensure. Please RSVP to events@aiaeb.org so we can have snacks and chairs for all! If you have specific questions please include them in your RSVP.

An Inside Look at the New IDP: Practice Management

On June 29, the Intern Development Program (IDP) will be updated to reflect six broad areas of architectural practice—and renamed the Architectural Experience Program (AXP). The following
is a breakdown of the Practice Management portion of AXP, including real-world examples of opportunities that count toward the AXP.

What is Practice Management?
Practice Management is where aspiring architects will gain competency in running an architecture firm. This is your chance to learn the ins and outs of managing a business—marketing the firm’s capabilities, securing new projects, working with clients, and sustaining a positive and professional culture, for example.

Practice Management Tasks (Required Hours: 160)
Upon finishing AXP, you should be able to competently perform the following tasks:
■ Adhere to ethical standards and codes of professional conduct
■ Develop professional and leadership skills within firm
■ Comply with laws and regulations governing the practice of architecture
■ Prepare proposals for services in response to client requirements
■ Prepare final procurement and contract documents
■ Participate in community activities that may provide opportunities or design of facilities that
reflect community needs
■ Understand implications of project delivery technologies
■ Develop procedures for responding to contractor requests (Requests for Information)
■ Participate in professional development activities that offer exchanges with other design profes
sionals
■ Understand implications of policies and procedures to ensure supervision of design work by ■ Establish procedures for documenting project decisions
■ Maintain positive work environment within firm that facilitates cooperation, teamwork, and
■ Develop procedures for responding to changes in project scope
■ Develop and maintain effective and productive relationships with clients.
■ Establish procedures to process documentation during contract administration

Are you having trouble gaining Practice Management experience? Reference the above tasks when meetingwith your supervisor, and make a plan to complete AXP.

Real-World Examples
During my first internship, I had the opportunity to develop some promotional materials that showcased the firm’s projects. The flyers were given to potential clients and were also featured in a local magazine! This type of experience would fall under the task, “prepare marketing documents that accurately communicate firm’s experience and capabilities.” Do you help manage your firm’s website or social media accounts? You might be able to earn a few hours in Practice Management.

Some of the tasks in this area can be tough to tackle early in your career—for instance, you might not “develop procedures for responding to changes in project scope” at your first job. That’s why it’s important to have regular conversations with your supervisor to ensure you’re exposed to a variety of tasks. Sometimes, you just might have to get creative. To “understand [the] implications of project delivery technologies,” you could outline the firm’s project delivery methods, and set up a meeting with your supervisor to learn why the firm chose each of the methods

IDP Experience Calculator

Use the IDP Experience Calculator to see how your current hours will merge into the six new experience
areas!

Understanding the New AXP: Project Planning & Design

On June 29, the Intern Development Program (IDP) will be updated to reflect six broad areas
of architectural practice—and renamed the Architectural Experience Program (AXP). To help
prepare for this change, NCARB launched a monthly blog series that breaks down the tasks
associated with each area. In addition to the blog, they offer real-world examples of opportunities that count toward the AXP.

What is Project Planning & Design?
Project Planning & Design occurs during the schematic design phase of a project, when you will begin to layout your building design, meet with your client, review applicable codes and coordinate schematics with your consultants. You will gain experience reading and applying building codes and regulations, coordinating with mechanical and structural engineers, design specialists, and other consultants and communicating the plan with the client.

Project Planning & Design Tasks (Required Hours: 1,080)
Upon finishing the AXP, you should be able to perform the following tasks:
■ Perform building code analysis
■ Develop sustainability goals based on existing environmental conditions
■ Prepare code analysis documentation
■ Define requirements for site survey based on established project scope
■ Select materials, finishes, and systems based on technical properties and aesthetic requirements
■ Determine design parameters for building engineering systems
■ Prepare design alternatives for client review
■ Present design ideas to client orally
■ Oversee design integration of building components and systems
■ Evaluate results of feasibility studies to determine project’s technical viability
■ Determine impact of existing utilities infrastructure on site
■ Apply principles of historic preservation for projects involving building restoration or renovation
■ Understand implications of evolving sustainable design strategies and technologies
■ Design landscape elements for site
■ Develop mitigation options to address adverse site conditions

Are you having trouble gaining Project Planning & Design experience? Reference the above tasks
when meeting with your supervisor, and make a plan to complete the AXP.

Real-World Examples
“At one of the firms I worked at prior to licensure, we would typically put together a few pages on building codes and zoning regulations pertaining to a new project. These “cliff notes” became a vital reference during schematic design and beyond. If anyone ever had a question about the project, we could easily find them in this document. The time I spent preparing this document would qualify for the task ‘perform building code analysis.’”

“Prepare cost of work estimates” can be difficult to gain right out of school. I started gaining experience by familiarizing myself with the materials and products we were planning to use on the project and talking to product/materials reps about costs and installation. This information was useful in determining what types of products meet the client’s budget and what needed to be adjusted. Sometimes, we would need to inform the client if we needed to set aside more money or change the scope of the project.”

IDP Experience Calculator
Use the IDP Experience Calculator to see how your current hours will merge into the six new
experience areas. Any hours that fall outside of the six new areas can be used to fulfill additional
jurisdictional requirements.

Other Useful Links:
Understanding the New AXP: Practice Management
Understanding the New AXP: Programming & Analysis

Seventeen Experience Levels Realigned into Six

On June 29, 2016 IDP’s current 17 experience areas will be realigned into six broad practice-based areas:

■ The six new experience areas are:
■ Practice Management
■ Project Management
■ Programming & Analysis
■ Project Planning & Design
■ Project Development & Documentation
■ Construction & Evaluation

To help you prepare for this change NCARB launched a monthly blog series that breaks down the tasks associated with each area. Plus, we offer real-world examples of opportunities that count toward the AXP. (Did you know that IDP is to be renamed the Architectural Experience Program—AXP?) In February, NCARB addressed the Programming & Analysis experience area.

What is Programming & Analysis?
Programming & Analysis is the first phase of a project, often referred to as pre-design. During this phase, big-picture ideas are addressed and a project plan is established. Candidates will gain experience by researching and evaluating client requirements, code and zoning ordinances and site data to develop recommendations on the feasibility of a project.

Programming & Analysis Tasks (Required Hours: 260)
Upon finishing the AXP, candidates should be able to competently perform the following tasks:
■ Determine impact of applicable zoning and development ordinances to determine project
onstraints
■ Gather information about community concerns and issues that may impact proposed project
■ Analyze existing site conditions to determine impact on facility layout
■ Evaluate results of feasibility studies to determine project’s financial viability
■ Determine impact of environmental, zoning and other regulations on site
■ Establish sustainability goals affecting building performance
■ Prepare diagrams illustrating spatial relationships and functional adjacencies
■ Establish project design goals
■ Prepare site analysis diagrams to document existing conditions, features, infrastructure and
regulatory requirements
■ Consider recommendations from geotechnical studies when establishing design parameters
■ Assist owner in preparing building program including list of spaces and their characteristics
■ Develop conceptual budget
■ Gather information about client’s vision, goals, budget, and schedule to validate project scope
and program
■ Evaluate opportunities and constraints of alternative sites
■ Assess environmental impact to formulate design decisions
■ Determine impact of existing transportation infrastructure on site
■ Consider results of environmental studies when developing site alternatives
■ Review legal documents related to site to determine project constraints

NCARB says, “Are you having trouble gaining Programming & Analysis experience? Reference the above tasks when meeting with your supervisor and make a plan to complete the AXP.”

Real-World Examples
“During my internship, I was tasked with evaluating the local zoning code to determine the maximum buildable area on a given site. At first, I expected to simply “determine [the] impact of applicable zoning and development ordinances to determine project constraints.” But I soon found myself consulting a local code authority while communicating with the client. These conversations led me to gain experience in five associated tasks, which ultimately informed my recommendation on the project’s financial viability.

Every project is unique, but every project starts with an idea that requires a program and thorough analysis. Like a project, your experience is unique and it sometimes requires periods of analysis.

If you find yourself lacking in experience in this area, use this time to ask your supervisor to attend a predesign meeting or offer to take on a new task. You might find yourself gaining much broader experience than you first anticipated.”

IDP Experience Calculator
Use the IDP Experience Calculator to see how your current hours will merge into the six new experience areas. Any hours that fall outside of the six new areas can be used to fulfill additional jurisdictional requirements.

Changes to IDP

In hopes of increasing efficiency, NCARB will begin making changes to the Intern Development Program
(IDP) by no longer requiring the completion of elective hours which were used previously by interns to
fulfill their 5,600 hour requirement.

There will be two phases to this streamlining process.

Phase 1 (July 1, 2015):
■ IDP will require 3,740 total hours defined by the existing 17 experience areas.
■ Focus will be more on core hours required (i.e. tasks necessary to perform competently in the
practice of architecture).

Core Experience Areas Required Hours
1. Pre-Design 260
2. Design 2600
3. Project Management 720
4. Practice Management 160
Total = 3,740
Supplemental Experience Opportunities may be used to satisfy the core minimum hours required in each
experience area. You may earn a maximum of 40 core hours in each of the IDP experience areas by completing any combination of the following NCARB-recognized supplemental experience opportunities:
■ Emerging Professional’s Companion (EPC)
■ NCARB’s Professional Conduct Monograph
■ CSI Certification: CCS & CCCA
■ Community-Based Design Center/Collaborative
■ Design Competitions
■Site Visit With Mentor
Reporting Requirements:
■ Report all experiences within eight months through My NCARB for credit.
■ Even if you’re currently earning elective hours, report them.
■ Experience reported after two-month filing period and up to five years after the date of the expe
rience will be accepted at a reduced value of 50% toward IDP requirements.
Why the change
■ There isn’t any statistical evidence that elective hours increase competency.
■ One hour of IDP experience today is not the same as it was five or 10 years ago.
■ Current practice of architecture involves a greater variety of activities, building types, practice
types, and projects than ever before. This change captures the “big picture” by allowing the interns to more freely explore learning opportunities within the office or on a particular project.
■ Encourages a focus on the experience rather than the program itself.

Emerging Professionals: What to Plan for in 2015

Derrick Porter, Assoc. AIA Associate Director

Derrick Porter,
Assoc. AIA
Associate Director

The New Year is upon us and 2015 has a lot to offer. It also is the beginning of a lot of changes for you, the Emerging Professional. To better understand, I will give you a quick recap of changes that will be taking place this year so you can be prepared and successful.

The biggest change is in regards to the Intern Development Program (IDP). Back in September the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) Board of Directors voted to approve changes to streamline the IDP program. This will be done in two phases. The first phase will be implemented mid-2015. It will involve the elimination of elective hours. Under the current program, interns are required to document 5,600 hours of experience, with 3,740 of those hours in 17 core experience areas. The remaining 1,860 elective hours will be removed. As a result, the total amount of hours required will be reduced to just the 3,740 hours of core hours, effectively reducing the time it takes to complete the IDP by as much as a year. This change should be implemented by June 2015. The next phase, which will roll out mid-2016, is a much greater overall change. In line with the implementation of ARE 5.0, which I will touch on later, it will realign the framework of IDP into six experience categories reflecting the six general areas of practice. Your existing experience will be mapped into the new, overhauled format. But don’t fret yet, as I said, this new framework will not take effect till mid-2016.

Another change that you may have missed, but is a huge relief for many, is the reduction of the wait time when retaking your AREs. Prior to the October 1, 2014 launch, a candidate had to wait six months prior to retaking an ARE exam that they failed. This meant that since there is such a long wait time, you would have to relearn the information. In many cases candidates would take other sections during this time, therefore having to restudy for the failed section. Since October 1st, however, the retake period has been reduced to three months. Not only does this allow a candidate to retake quickly, it reduces the amount of information that they may otherwise forget. This is especially important if you plan on passing your exams prior to the implementation of the new ARE 5.0 framework.

The change that will not take effect till late next year is important to take note of if you plan on finishing your exams prior to ARE 5.0. As I wrote in the July ArchNews, ARE 5.0 is set to begin implementation in late 2016. So if you have begun taking your exams it may be beneficial to you to take advantage of the study materials that you currently have and make a plan towards finishing your exams this year and the beginning of next year. The new retake policy will help if you do fail an exam. If you do, don’t be discouraged as the ARE 5.0 will allow for transferring exams over from the current framework.

So plan ahead this year. And also keep an eye on the AIA East Bay calendar for upcoming Emerging Professional Forums, Architecture movie nights, Habitat for Humanity build days, and many additional events this year.

Habitat for Humanity Build Day

8.30am-4pm
Muir Ridge Development, 401 Heron Lane, Martinez, CA
Please click here for more information and to register!

It is finally officially underway! No more permit issues or cancellations!! Join us as we help Habitat for Humanity East Bay / Silicon Valley build a home for our local community.

We will be helping with the Muir Ridge development site on Heron Lane in Martinez. It is a 20 home development which began construction on November 20th. This is a great opportunity to see what goes into the building of a home and what the lines on a plan actually become in the field and at the same time make the dream of home ownership possible for a local family.

Also, the hours worked do count toward IDP credit for those working toward their license. No experience is needed and this is open to all so tell your friends, coworkers, and family to join you!

And since this is also occurring on Valentine’s Day, bring your significant other for a great couples build.

Habitat for Humanity Build Day

This Build Day has been postponed to January 10, 2015 due to permitting issues.

Saturday, December 13, 2014
8.30am-4pm
Muir Ridge Development, Heron Lane
San Martinez, CA
Please email events@aiaeb.org for more information.

Join us as we help Habitat for Humanity East Bay / Silicon Valley build a home for our local community this holiday season!

We will be helping with the Muir Ridge development site on Heron Lane in Martinez. It is a 20 home development which began construction on November 20th. This is a great opportunity to see what goes into the building of a home and what the lines on a plan actually become in the field and at the same time make the dream of home ownership possible for a local family.

Also, the hours worked do count toward IDP credit for those working toward their license. No experience is needed and this is open to all so tell your friends, coworkers, and family to join you!

2014 IDP Design Competition

IDP500

A program by AIA San Fernando Valley

Registration Due: Monday, December 22, 2014 

Submissions Due: Monday, March 2, 2015

Winners Announced Monday, March 30, 2015

 

Click Here for the application form and program requirements

The competition involves the design of the San Fernando Valley Rescue Mission. Recently, this mission was lost due to fire. A new site has been selected and the AIA San Fernando Valley has worked with the staff of the mission to provide the programmatic requirements. While Survival Outreach Services has served as an emergency stopgap, the loss of the production, donation, residential facilities and half of the vehicles fleet has caused a significant loss of support of the mission’s work with the homeless. This new facility will be enlarged enabling the mission to reduce the homeless population by offering self‐sufficiency, life skills classes and training to the homeless.

Prizes will be rewarded to:

Interns:

1st Place: $1,500.00
2nd Place: $1,000.00
3rd Place: $ 500.00

Students:

1st Place: $ 500.00
2nd Place: $ 300.00
3rd Place: $ 200.00

The competition is open to all NACRB/IDP participants. The project submissions can be from individuals or teams. Credit for IDP hours is available to all participants working with a mentor. Each participant will be responsible for self‐reporting hours as detailed in the IDP Guidelines. A maximum of 300 hours are available. Intern and student submissions will be judged separately.

Sponsored by Stock Building Supply and Jeld-Wen Windows & Doors

Professional Practice Forum: Mentoring in the Practice–not just for Young People

Thursday, November 20, 2013
Noon-1:30pm

Free–bring a bag lunch and come ready to talk!

1.5 CES LUs

The Intern Development Program (IDP) makes mentoring a requirement in any firm that employs licensure candidates. Whose responsibility is it to ensure the mentoring relationship is productive–for all involved? What works, and doesn’t work, in mentoring programs? Are the best relationships ones that aren’t tied to IDP or a firm at all? And what about reversing the traditional mentoring structure of the older, more experienced mentor and young protege? How can today’s emerging professionals help established architects grow and develop even further?empowerment