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Posts tagged ‘licensure’

Path to Licensure

Monday, July 17, 2017
6pm
Free and open to all. RSVP to events@aiaeb.org.

Want to get licensed, but not sure how to get started? Confused about IDP/AXP/ARE/CAB/NCARB? Have all the recent changes in the process left you flummoxed? Come to AIA East Bay for a presentation on the Path to Licensure. Please RSVP to events@aiaeb.org so we can have snacks and chairs for all! If you have specific questions please include them in your RSVP.

MCE/ADA Day – June 19, 2015

MCE/ADA Day: Accessibility for California Architects
Friday, June 19, 2015 8:30am-3pm
Location: AIA East Bay, 1405 Clay Street, Oakland, CA 94612
Cost: $110 AIA Members / $150 non-membersIncludes coffee, fruit and lunch.
Please Click Here to Register

5 CES/HSW/MCE LUs

This month’s MCE/ADA Day emphasizes architects’ ability to changes peoples’ lives through design. In the morning session, Jan Garrett, Esq., will review universal design and accessibility standards and how they benefit people with disabilities. In the afternoon session, Ally Watts, AIA, CASp, will present tools for understanding and navigating Chapter 11B, providing examples of local design that are “elegant solutions” to ADA and CBC requirements. We encourage you to bring your copy of Chapter 11B to follow along.

Presenters:
Morning Session: Jan Garrett, Esq., Program Manager, Pacific ADA Center
Afternoon Session: Ally Watts, AIA, CASp

Provides the complete 5 hours of disability access coursework required for California Licensure.

MCE/ADA Day: April 24, 2015

MCE/ADA Day: Accessibility for California Architects
Friday, April 24, 2015 8:30am-3pm
Location: AIA East Bay, 1405 Clay Street, Oakland, CA 94612
Cost: $110 AIA Members / $150 non-membersIncludes coffee, fruit and lunch.
Online Registration is Currently Closed. Please call 510 464 3600 as we may still have spaces available.
Please Click Here to Register

 

5 CES/HSW/MCE LUs

Presenters:
Morning Session: Erick Mikiten, AIA

  • Connection between Universal Design and Sustainable Design will be discussed.
  • An explanation of the 7 principles of Universal Design.
  • Case studies of single-family and multifamily projects that demonstrate Universal Design.
  • A review of some of the key CBC changes that take effect in July.

Afternoon Session: Dawn Anderson, AIA, CASp

  • Mandatory improvements required under federal and state laws and regulations affecting alterations to primary function areas.
  • Scoping provisions/technical elements when considering improvements to existing buildings, including qualified historical properties, large developments, and public facilities.
  • Concepts such as “existing” construction, “primary path of travel”, “primary function areas”, “unreasonable hardship” and other terms will be reviewed.
  • Priority use of compulsory funding for the removal of architectural barriers and examples of effective solutions in architectural barrier removal will be presented.

Provides the complete 5 hours of disability access coursework required for California Licensure.

About the Presenters:

Erick Mikiten, AIA. Erick is the principal of Mikiten Architecture and was a lecturer and instructor at the University of California, Berkeley for several years. Erick is an expert in design for people with physical disabilities and currently sits on the Building Standards Commission, overseeing the development, adoption and publication of California’s building codes.

Dawn Anderson, AIA CASp. Dawn is the principal of As It Stands, a full-service architectural firm specializing in accessible design and construction in the built environment. The firm serves a variety of corporate, non-profit, and jurisdictional clients. Ms. Anderson participates nationally in the development of the ANSI A117 Standard and has served on California’s Division of State Architect Advisory code task force and the Commission on Disabled Access.

Learning Objectives

Emerging Professionals: What to Plan for in 2015

Derrick Porter, Assoc. AIA Associate Director

Derrick Porter,
Assoc. AIA
Associate Director

The New Year is upon us and 2015 has a lot to offer. It also is the beginning of a lot of changes for you, the Emerging Professional. To better understand, I will give you a quick recap of changes that will be taking place this year so you can be prepared and successful.

The biggest change is in regards to the Intern Development Program (IDP). Back in September the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) Board of Directors voted to approve changes to streamline the IDP program. This will be done in two phases. The first phase will be implemented mid-2015. It will involve the elimination of elective hours. Under the current program, interns are required to document 5,600 hours of experience, with 3,740 of those hours in 17 core experience areas. The remaining 1,860 elective hours will be removed. As a result, the total amount of hours required will be reduced to just the 3,740 hours of core hours, effectively reducing the time it takes to complete the IDP by as much as a year. This change should be implemented by June 2015. The next phase, which will roll out mid-2016, is a much greater overall change. In line with the implementation of ARE 5.0, which I will touch on later, it will realign the framework of IDP into six experience categories reflecting the six general areas of practice. Your existing experience will be mapped into the new, overhauled format. But don’t fret yet, as I said, this new framework will not take effect till mid-2016.

Another change that you may have missed, but is a huge relief for many, is the reduction of the wait time when retaking your AREs. Prior to the October 1, 2014 launch, a candidate had to wait six months prior to retaking an ARE exam that they failed. This meant that since there is such a long wait time, you would have to relearn the information. In many cases candidates would take other sections during this time, therefore having to restudy for the failed section. Since October 1st, however, the retake period has been reduced to three months. Not only does this allow a candidate to retake quickly, it reduces the amount of information that they may otherwise forget. This is especially important if you plan on passing your exams prior to the implementation of the new ARE 5.0 framework.

The change that will not take effect till late next year is important to take note of if you plan on finishing your exams prior to ARE 5.0. As I wrote in the July ArchNews, ARE 5.0 is set to begin implementation in late 2016. So if you have begun taking your exams it may be beneficial to you to take advantage of the study materials that you currently have and make a plan towards finishing your exams this year and the beginning of next year. The new retake policy will help if you do fail an exam. If you do, don’t be discouraged as the ARE 5.0 will allow for transferring exams over from the current framework.

So plan ahead this year. And also keep an eye on the AIA East Bay calendar for upcoming Emerging Professional Forums, Architecture movie nights, Habitat for Humanity build days, and many additional events this year.

ARE Seminar: Schematic Design

Saturday, March 21, 2015 10am-3pm (approx.)
Cost: $40 AIA Members & Employees of AIA East Bay Chapter Member Firms / $75 non-members
.
Click Here to Register

4 CES LUs

Jeremiah Tolbert, AIA, instructs this ARE Seminar on Schematic Design. This seminar is offered to those looking for a prep seminar in studying for the ARE.

Learning Objectives

1. Attendees will review and access sites; incorporate the implication of human behavior, historic precedent, and design theory in the selection of systems, materials and methods related to site design and construction.
2. Attendees will learn how to interpret site and environmental conditions. Assess and apply systems, materials, and construction methods – incorporating principles of sustainability.
3. Attendees will learn how to incorporate building codes, specialty codes, zoning and other regulatory requirements in site design and construction.
4. Attendees will learn how to analyze the implication of design decisions in the selection of systems, materials and methods incorporated in site design and construction

MCE/ADA Day: February 26, 2015

MCE/ADA Day: Accessibility for California Architects
Thursday, February 26, 2015 8:30am-3pm
Location: AIA East Bay, 1405 Clay Street, Oakland, CA 94612
Cost: $110 AIA Members / $150 non-members Includes coffee, fruit and lunch.
Please Click Here to Register

 

5 CES/HSW/MCE LUs

Presenters:
Steven Winkel, FAIA CASp

Craig Williams, CASp

Provides the complete 5 hours of disability access coursework required for California Licensure.

Morning Session: Steven Winkel, FAIA CASp will present 2.5 hours on public accommodations from CBC Chapter 11B.

Afternoon Session: Craig Williams, CASp will present 2.5 hours on compliance, getting projects through jurisdictional review and negotiating for common sense solutions.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify changes to the ADA Standards.
  2. Identify additional modifications to the ADAS by California in CBC Chapter 11B for Public Accommodations.
  3. State key concepts pertaining to compliance, getting projects through jurisdictional review and navigating/negotiating for common sense solutions.
  4. Recognize some common accessibility errors in construction documents and in the field.

MCE/ADA Day: December 5, 2014

MCE/ADA Day: Accessibility for California Architects
Friday, December 5, 2014 8:30am-3pm
Location: AIA East Bay, 1405 Clay Street, Oakland, CA 94612
Cost: $110 AIA Members / $150 non-members Includes coffee, fruit and lunch.
Click Here to Register


 

5 CES/HSW/MCE LUs

Presenters:
Steven Winkel, FAIA CASp

Craig Williams, CASp

Provides the complete 5 hours of disability access coursework required for California Licensure.

Morning Session: California Building Code Chapter 11B for “Public Accommodations” and ADA Standards
Afternoon Session: Multifamily Accessibility

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify changes to the ADA Standards.
  2. Identify additional modifications to the ADAS by California in CBC Chapter 11B for Public Accommodations.
  3. State Key concepts pertaining to accessibility requirements which must be incorporated into the design and construction of multifamily housing covered by the regulations.
  4. Recognize some common accessibility errors in construction documents and in the field.

The Road to ARE 5.0

By Derrick Porter, Assoc. AIA

an Emerging Professionals column

The Architect Registration Examination ARE undergoes a metamorphosis of sorts every few years. Those currently in school, or who have not begun their testing, may see the following as a reference for what to expect when ARE 5.0 becomes available. For those, like myself, currently working on their testing under the current ARE 4.0 sections, this will give you a game plan to follow in order to make the transition seamless.

Before I get into the particulars, here’s a little history as to why ARE 5.0 is coming into existence and the steps up to this point to put it together. It began in September of 2013 when over 40 architects gathered in Portland, Oregon to become the Test Specification Task Force. They were tasked with developing the new content areas and assessment objectives for the new divisions. They worked to determine the knowledge and skills that would be measured in each division along with the development of the transition plan for candidates in the process of taking the ARE. Through the continuing effort of the Research and Development Subcommittee and the Graphics Grading Subcommittee, NCARB has developed a testing structure that coincides with changing technology and a different approach to the exam. Not only have they developed new sections but, to the happiness of future exam takers, have eliminated the archaic CAD graphics portion. Instead they have integrated graphic testing alongside multiple choice and are taking a look at using case studies.

ARE5_CreditModel-page-001

Now let’s get into the particulars. The new sections are as follows: Practice Management, Project Management, Programming & Analysis, Project Planning & Design, Project Development & Documentation, and Construction & Evaluation. Understandably the naming of the sections tends to make them blur together. It is not nearly as straight forward as Building Systems or Site Planning & Design but what is key to understand is they blend a number of aspects of what we are used to in order to better evaluate the candidate in a more cohesive manner. On the NCARB website you can take a look at the 15-page Test Specification to get a better understanding of what these sections contain. What I am providing is more of a road map of what to take now, so you either don’t have to worry about their meaning, or only need to dive into a few of them if that time does come.

So you may be asking yourself, should I wait for ARE 5.0 or continue/begin ARE 4.0”? To answer this you have to ask yourself a few questions. Has your rolling clock begun, i.e. if it has, how much time do you have left before tests begin to drop off? What divisions in 4.0 have you already passed? And finally, if you are eligible to begin testing under 4.0, are you willing to wait for 5.0 to launch? First off, if you answered the third question as ‘Yes,’ I highly encourage you to get started in 4.0 and the following will explain why. ARE 4.0 will continue to be available after 5.0 launches in late 2016. In addition, 4.0 will continue to be offered until 18 months after 5.0 inception and be retired in June 2018. That means even if you have not begun 4.0 you technically have almost four years to finish it and enjoy the massive amount of study tools already available to you. Now in 2016 when 5.0 begins, candidates who have begun 4.0 can begin to transition to 5.0 if the 18 months are not enough time to finish. This is where the transition plan mentioned before comes in handy. The ARE 5.0 Credit Model is a matrix that identifies the relationships between the seven divisions of 4.0 and the six divisions of 5.0. Essentially it breaks down what to pass in order to receive credit for a 5.0 exam. This is where being strategic can make the transition as streamlined as possible. NCARB has a three- step approach to successfully transition which I will describe here for you. First, take Construction Documents & Services (CDS), this will knock out Construction & Evaluation, and it is also a key component in four out of the six ARE 5.0 sections. Next, take Programming, Planning, and Practice (PPP) combined with CDS this will take care of two more sections, Practice Management and Project Management. Then take Site Planning & Design (SPD) combined with PPP you will finish Programming & Analysis. If you are able to finish these three 4.0 sections, you only would have three sections of 5.0 to complete to get your license.

As you can see, the transition to ARE 5.0 can be accomplished but it has to be handled on a case by case basis. As I mentioned, I highly encourage candidates for licensure to begin 4.0 and not wait. Don’t delay your goal of becoming licensed. And for those who will become candidates between now and 2016, do what is comfortable for you. There are a lot of resources currently available for ARE 4.0 sections, including our Prep Seminars that are offered at AIA East Bay. Study materials for 5.0 will become available eventually, but why wait?

ADA Day: Accessibility for California Architects

Friday, January 18, 2013
8:30am-3pm (coffee & fruit available from 8-8:30am)
ADA Day: Accessibility for California Architects
Presenter: Craig Williams, CASp
Location:
AIA East Bay, 1405 Clay Street, Oakland, CA 94612
Cost: $100 AIA Members / $140 non-members
Includes coffee, fruit and lunch

Click here to register.  REGISTRATION CLOSES AT 5pm Wednesday January 16.

This 5-hour presentation will complete all California required ADA/Accessibility hours for architects’ 2013 licensure renewal.

This course will cover the application of common ADA requirements for existing Title III “Public Accommodation” facilities.  The instructor will cover the most commonly litigated access issues in California.  The course is designed for Architects, Engineers, building professionals, CASp’s and Code officials who are conducting accessibility site evaluations, preparing designs, performing plan reviews and construction field verification at existing buildings.

The goal of this program is to highlight and feature those areas common to most buildings, facilities and sites.  In addition, the training will also touch on common errors, omissions and assumptions that lead to confusion, redesign, project delays, change orders and cost overruns. We will discuss how to avoid errors and omissions, substandard construction and the exposure to complaints and legal action that can arise from non-compliance and deficiencies in accessibility.

The presenter will emphasize the specific technical provisions of the new 2010 ADA Standards and point out areas where it differs from the old guidelines. We will also be introduced to the anticipated changes in the 2013 California Building Code.

This course will focus on California accessibility and Federal ADA requirements pertaining to existing buildings. The material is presented in three parts, combining an overview of up-to-date regulatory requirements with hands-on activities. The presentation will follow an outline similar to the following, with the addition of a section on Universal Design:

Part I: General Code Framework for Working with Existing Buildings

Understanding and properly applying California code and Federal standards as they relate to existing buildings

Important definitions relevant to existing building accessibility

Triggering elements: Additions, alterations, repairs, change of use and occupancy

Accessibility Compliance Strategies – practical applications

Part II: Common Accessibility Requirements That Arise in Existing Buildings

Overview and application of 2010 CBC and the 2010 ADA technical requirements pertaining to parking, exterior paths of travel, interior paths of travel, stairs, elevators, restrooms, drinking fountains and signage

Tools and effective techniques in properly applying state and federal design standards

Part III: Practicum and Discussion

Identifying and solving common practice problems stemming from deficiencies in access compliance

Reasonability and the imperfect world

Navigating the permit process efficiently – avoiding common pitfalls

Strategies and practical methods to consider in practice

Standard of Care, QA/QC and verification

Changing Landscape – Code cycles – 2010 ADA Standards & 2013 CBC

ADA Day

Friday, August 24, 2012
8:00am – 3:30pm
AIA East Bay
1405 Clay Street, Oakland

Registration and coffee from 8-8:30am. Program begins at 8:30.

Cost: $95 AIA Members; $135 Non-members

Click here to register.

Presenter: Craig Williams
This 5-hour presentation will complete all California required ADA/Accessibility hours for architects’ 2013 licensure renewal.

This course will cover the application of common ADA requirements for existing Title III “Public Accommodation” facilities.  The instructor will cover the most commonly litigated access issues in California.  The course is designed for Architects, Engineers, building professionals, CASp’s and Code officials who are conducting accessibility site evaluations, preparing designs, performing plan reviews and construction field verification at existing buildings.

The goal of this program is to highlight and feature those areas common to most buildings, facilities and sites.  In addition, the training will also touch on common errors, omissions and assumptions that lead to confusion, redesign, project delays, change orders and cost overruns. We will discuss how to avoid errors and omissions, substandard construction and the exposure to complaints and legal action that can arise from non-compliance and deficiencies in accessibility.

The presenter will emphasize the specific technical provisions of the new 2010 ADA Standards and point out areas where it differs from the old guidelines. We will also be introduced to the anticipated changes in the 2013 California Building Code.

This course will focus on California accessibility and Federal ADA requirements pertaining to existing buildings. The material is presented in three parts, combining an overview of up-to-date regulatory requirements with hands-on activities:

Part I: General Code Framework for Working with Existing Buildings
Understanding and properly applying California code and Federal standards as they relate to existing buildings
Important definitions relevant to existing building accessibility
Triggering elements: Additions, alterations, repairs, change of use and occupancy
Accessibility Compliance Strategies – practical applications

Part II: Common Accessibility Requirements That Arise in Existing Buildings
Overview and application of 2010 CBC and the 2010 ADA technical requirements pertaining to parking, exterior paths of travel, interior paths of travel, stairs, elevators, restrooms, drinking fountains and signage
Tools and effective techniques in properly applying state and federal design standards

Part III: Practicum and Discussion
Identifying and solving common practice problems stemming from deficiencies in access compliance
Reasonability and the imperfect world
Navigating the permit process efficiently – avoiding common pitfalls
Strategies and practical methods to consider in practice
Standard of Care, QA/QC and verification
Changing Landscape – Code cycles – 2010 ADA Standards & 2013 CBC

Click here to register.

5 CES/HSW/MCE Lus