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Posts from the ‘CES’ Category

Enduring Architectural Integrity with Thomas A. Kligerman: Partner Program

What’s New in Revit?

11:30am-1pm
Free and open to all. Lunch provided by Ideate + IMAGINiT.

Click here to register.

1.5 CES LUs

Spring is in the air! It’s a great time to get out of the office, join us for lunch and learn about the new features and functionality in Revit 2019.

At this month’s Revit user group, you will hear from Eugene A. O’Day, IX, Architecture, Engineering, Construction, and Owner (AECO) Solutions Team Lead for Ideate + IMAGINiT. Having recently attended the Autodesk One Team Extension Conference (OTx), Eugene is excited to discuss Revit 2019, including core improvements and discipline-specific enhancements for Architecture, MEP, and Structure.

About the presenter:

Eugene A. O’Day, IX, has more than 25 years of architectural and mechanical experience, and he offers a trained focus on all things Revit and BIM. Teaching is a passion of his. Eugene has been an instructor in undergraduate degree programs; has traveled worldwide teaching Autodesk solutions to major corporations; has taught at accredited Autodesk Training Centers throughout the northwestern region; and is a frequent and popular instructor, speaker, and presenter for AUGI® CAD Camps, Revit – and related product user groups. He has also been a trusted public school district advisor on new drafting instructor hires. At Ideate, Eugene provides training and support for Revit Architecture, Revit Structure, and AutoCAD. Eugene is also a Revit Architecture Autodesk Certified Professional.

ADA/MCE Day August 24, 2018

Friday, August 24, 2018
8:30am-3:45pm
$110 AIA Members; $150 Non-members. Includes light breakfast and lunch
Click here to register

5 CES/HSW/MCE LUs

Attorney and accessibility expert Jan Garrett, CASp presents the full five-hours of education required for your 2019 California license renewal. Click here to register.  5 CES/HSW/MCE LUs
$110 AIA members; $150 Non-members. Light breakfast & lunch included.

Sculpting Architectural Space with Light: Small Firm Forum

Thursday, June 7, 2018
Noon-1:30pm
Free AIA Members / $3 Nonmembers
Lunch will be provided by Apparatus Design; Click here to register.

1.5 CES LUs

Sculpting Architectural Space with Light gives designers fluency in LED lighting technology by demonstrating the use of LED products in residential applications. Product demonstrations will be used to clearly illustrate design and engineering innovation, quality of light concerns, and the lighting layers that enhance architectural spaces. After the training there will be a question and answer session and an opportunity to see the products and discuss how they can optimized for your projects.

We will discuss updates in architectural lighting technology and how they impact your current projects. Designers will learn how to guide clients towards informed decisions about LED lighting as the result of their increased understanding of quality of light and required to make design projects 100% successful.

The extensive research conducted in preparing the Innovators in LED Lighting presentation provides practical guidance for specifiers to gain fluency in LED Lighting technology.

About the Presenters:

Therese Lahaie is an independent consultant who connects lighting designers and manufacturers with LED lighting solutions. She serves as program advisor for the light & architecture conference Lightspace California and as juror for the architectural lighting competition 40under40 North America. Therese also has an active career as an artist working in the medium of light.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the four lighting layers needed to make the spaces you design look three-dimensional.
  2. Identify the benefits of color-tunable LED lighting for residential applications.
  3. Be able to list the ways that color temperature or degrees Kelvin and CRI color rendering index improves the final design project.
  4. Identify the biggest technical challenges for LED lighting manufacturers and how are these challenges addressed.

Design Tour: Bishop O’Dowd High School

Saturday, May 19, 2018
10-11:30am
$5 Members / $10 Nonmembers
Click here to register.

1.5 CES LUs

Interested in seeing an educational building set in an ecological restoration of a once abandoned hillside? Susi Marzuola, AIA of Siegel & Strain Architects leads a tour of this Zero Net Energy site. Bishop O’Dowd Center for Environmental Studies was the 2017 AIA East Bay COTE Sustainable Design Honorable Mention winner.

The Center for Environmental Studies (CES) at Bishop O’Dowd High School in Oakland serves the school’s environmental science curriculum while offering learning and gathering spaces for the campus community.The building’s two large laboratory classrooms expand onto a generous covered patio – a third classroom – overlooking the Living Lab, Oakland and the Bay.

Hard Hat Tour: Las Positas Multidisciplinary Academic Building

Friday, May 11, 2018
10-11:30am
3000 Campus Hill Dr, Livermore, CA 94551, USA
Cost: $5 AIA Members/$10 Guests   Click here to register

1.5 CES LUs

Mark Shoeman, AIA of HMC Architects, will lead a special hard hat tour of the multidisciplinary academic building at Las Positas College in Livermore. The 43,000sf, $14.5M classroom building is envisioned to redefine classroom buildings on college campuses, and to create much-needed student-centric spaces at Las Positas College.

Organized on two floors around student gathering spaces and sticky spaces are 12 classrooms, 6 labs, and a 100-seat lecture hall. All the public spaces are organized about a central, flexible student space and glass administrative spaces. The building is designed with a LEED Platinum target, with LED lighting, 15 KVa of photovoltaic panels, battery storage system, daylight lighting controls, and rainwater gardens.

About the speaker:

Mark Schoeman, AIA is a talented designer with more than 30 years of experience in all phases of programming, design, and construction documentation for university and college projects. He is passionate about exploring the boundaries of a design problem while seeing creative solutions to client problems, and his work has received numerous awards. Mark was the Principal Designer for Las Positas College Multi-Disciplinary Academic Building 100.

Mills College: Design Tour

Friday, May 18, 2018
9-10:30am
$5 Members / $10 Nonmembers
Location: 5000 MacArthur Blvd, Oakland

Click here to register.

1.5 CES LUs

Campus architect Karen Fiene, FAIA leads a tour of her favorite designs on the Mills College campus, including historic and ground-breaking buildings. This tour will meet at the front of Mills Hall, at the center of campus.

Mills College, founded in 1852 sits on 135 acres and has a lake and three creeks running through the property. We have about 1 million square feet in 64 buildings, the oldest dating to 1871. Julia Morgan did one of her first projects here, the iconic El Campanil bell tower from 1904. We have four other Julia Morgan buildings including the Margaret Carnegie Library, Alumnae Hall Student Union, Kapiolani Cottage and Alderwood Hall. In 2006 the college embarked on the largest facilities upgrades undertaking in half a century. This work included new student housing, the Betty Irene Moore Natural Sciences Building addition, restoration of the Littlefield Concert Hall and construction of the Lokey Graduate School of Business designed by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Lisser Hall, a dramatic performing arts theater designed by Willis Polk in 1901, is being full renovated to bring the building up to seismic and ADA codes. It will be nearing completion at the end of June.

 

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential/Nonresidential Building Enclosures

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
8:30am-Noon

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary residential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ lowrise residential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to explain which has greater moisture carrying capacity and why: vapor diffusion through materials or air leakage through gaps in the enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a lowrise residential building.

 

Building Science Principles for High Performance Nonresidential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
1-4:30pm

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary nonresidential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ nonresidential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to describe the mechanism of heat loss from the building interior through a concrete slab that extends continuously beyond the building enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a nonresidential building.

 

About the Presenter:

John Straube, Ph.D., P.Eng., is a Principal at RDH Building Science Inc., where he heads forensic investigations and leads research projects in the areas of low-energy building design, building enclosure performance, hygrothermal analysis, and field monitoring of wall assemblies. He is also a prolific writer, a noted public speaker, and a sought-after “performance coach” who helps other building professionals coordinate their efforts and achieve higher levels of performance in their projects. Over the course of his career, Dr. Straube has also been deeply involved in the areas of building enclosure design and whole building performance, as a consultant, researcher, and educator.

Kitchen Design: Vectorworks User Group

Tuesday, May 8, 2018
6-8pm
Free and open to all.     

1.5 CES LUs

Our discussion focuses on kitchen design.  We are pleased that Mark Stech-Novak, notable restaurant design consultant, will be sharing his work with us.  We will also discuss the tools available in Vectorworks and other resources to facilitate designing commercial and residential kitchens.

About the Presenters:

Mark-Stech-Novak, Principal, Mark Stech-Novak Restaurant Consultation Design, is a chef and owner of two renowned San Francisco restaurants, and has over 30 years experience designing restaurants and custom kitchens throughout the world.

Paul Majka, Principal, Paul Majka Architect Inc., is a seasoned professional in Architecture with about 15 years of experience with Vectorworks, and is currently running an architectural practice in San Francisco.

Learning Objectives:

  1. See how others use Vectorworks to design kitchens for their projects.
  2. Learn about some of the important factors that contribute to well-designed kitchens.
  3. Understand what tools are available in Vectorworks for designing kitchens, and how they can be used effectively.
  4. Learn of other resources are available to facilitate the design of kitchens.

Case Study: Center for Environmental Studies at Bishop O’Dowd High School

Thursday, April 19, 2018
6pm
Free and open to all. RSVP to events@aiaeb.org.

1.5 CES LUs

Susi Marzuola, AIA of Siegel and Strain Architects discusses the 2017 AIA East Bay COTE Sustainable Design Honorable Mention winner, The Center for Environmental Studies at Bishop O’Dowd High School. Please note: this is a presentation at the chapter office, not a design tour.