Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Programs & Events’ Category

Hard Hat Tour: Las Positas Multidisciplinary Academic Building

Friday, May 11, 2018
10-11:30am
3000 Campus Hill Dr, Livermore, CA 94551, USA
Cost: $5 AIA Members/$10 Guests   Click here to register

1.5 CES LUs

Mark Shoeman, AIA of HMC Architects, will lead a special hard hat tour of the multidisciplinary academic building at Las Positas College in Livermore. The 43,000sf, $14.5M classroom building is envisioned to redefine classroom buildings on college campuses, and to create much-needed student-centric spaces at Las Positas College.

Organized on two floors around student gathering spaces and sticky spaces are 12 classrooms, 6 labs, and a 100-seat lecture hall. All the public spaces are organized about a central, flexible student space and glass administrative spaces. The building is designed with a LEED Platinum target, with LED lighting, 15 KVa of photovoltaic panels, battery storage system, daylight lighting controls, and rainwater gardens.

About the speaker:

Mark Schoeman, AIA is a talented designer with more than 30 years of experience in all phases of programming, design, and construction documentation for university and college projects. He is passionate about exploring the boundaries of a design problem while seeing creative solutions to client problems, and his work has received numerous awards. Mark was the Principal Designer for Las Positas College Multi-Disciplinary Academic Building 100.

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential/Nonresidential Building Enclosures

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
8:30am-Noon

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary residential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ lowrise residential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to explain which has greater moisture carrying capacity and why: vapor diffusion through materials or air leakage through gaps in the enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a lowrise residential building.

 

Building Science Principles for High Performance Nonresidential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
1-4:30pm

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary nonresidential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ nonresidential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to describe the mechanism of heat loss from the building interior through a concrete slab that extends continuously beyond the building enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a nonresidential building.

 

About the Presenter:

John Straube, Ph.D., P.Eng., is a Principal at RDH Building Science Inc., where he heads forensic investigations and leads research projects in the areas of low-energy building design, building enclosure performance, hygrothermal analysis, and field monitoring of wall assemblies. He is also a prolific writer, a noted public speaker, and a sought-after “performance coach” who helps other building professionals coordinate their efforts and achieve higher levels of performance in their projects. Over the course of his career, Dr. Straube has also been deeply involved in the areas of building enclosure design and whole building performance, as a consultant, researcher, and educator.

Case Study: Center for Environmental Studies at Bishop O’Dowd High School

Thursday, April 19, 2018
6pm
Free and open to all. RSVP to events@aiaeb.org.

1.5 CES LUs

Susi Marzuola, AIA of Siegel and Strain Architects discusses the 2017 AIA East Bay COTE Sustainable Design Honorable Mention winner, The Center for Environmental Studies at Bishop O’Dowd High School. Please note: this is a presentation at the chapter office, not a design tour.

 

Young Architects vs. Emerging Professionals Trivia Night

This event has been postponed to May 23.
Thursday, April 26, 2018

6-8pm
$3 AIA Members / $5 Nonmembers
Click here to register.

Join the battle of the Young Architects Forum vs. Emerging Professionals to test your industry knowledge over beer and pizza. Each member of the winning team will receive a ticket to the 2018 Home Tours–at $50 value!

SB 827: Examining Effects in Transit-Rich Neighborhoods

Tuesday, April 24, 2018
5:30pm
Free AIA Members/employees of chapter member firms / $10 guests; After 4/22: $10 AIA Members/employees of chapter member firms / $15 guests
Click here to register.

1.5 CES LUs

Please join AIA East Bay to learn about SB 827, a bill before California’s State Senate which would supersede local zoning to increase the extent and density of development near transit. If passed, the bill would increase by-right building heights within one-half mile of rail stations. Allowable building heights would vary depending on the distance to train stations. To illustrate, new buildings within a 1/4 mile could reach 55 feet by-right. Farther out but within a 1/2 mile, building heights could be 45 feet.

We will examine SB 827’s implications on neighborhood form and explore planning opportunities as we hear from experts conversant in public policy, urban economics, and building and city design typologies.

The presentation will be followed by a wine and cheese reception.

Speakers include:

Laura Foote Clark, YIMBY Action
Kelan Stoy & Kuan Butts, Urban Footprint
Sujata Srivastava, Strategic Economics
John Ellis, Mithun

Moderator: Jay Castle, Assoc. AIA, Meshwork Organization

Mass Timber Construction: Products, Performance and Design

Thursday, May 17, 2018
9:30am-12:45pm
$20. Lunch Provided by Woodworks.
Click here to register.

2 CES/HSW LUs

Due to their high strength, dimensional stability and positive environmental performance, mass timber building products are quickly becoming materials of choice for sustainably-minded designers. This presentation will provide a detailed look at the variety of mass timber products available, including glue-laminated timber (glulam), cross laminated timber (CLT), nail laminated timber (NLT), heavy timber decking, and other engineered and composite systems. Applications for the use of these products under modern building codes will be discussed, and examples of their use in U.S. projects reviewed. Mass timber’s ability to act as both structure and exposed finish will also be highlighted, as will its performance as part of an assembly, considering design objectives related to structural performance, fire resistance, acoustics, and energy efficiency. Other topics will include detailing and construction best practices, lessons learned from completed projects and trends for the increased use of mass timber products in the future.

Speaker: Janelle Leafblad, Regional Director, WoodWorks

Masonry Design and Construction: Lessons Learned

Friday, March 30, 2018
8:30am
Free and open A/E/C industry professionals.
Space is limited. Click here to register.

1 CES/HSW LU

Join us for breakfast and masonry education as we review case studies and share many of the lessons learned throughout our years of west coast masonry design and construction.

This session uses a case study format to highlight ten commonly made masonry construction, detailing and design mistakes.  These mistakes can lead to on-going building performance issues throughout the course of the building’s life.  Topics include material understanding, moisture and movement issues, field testing, supervisory methods and constructability. This program is sponsored by the International Masonry Institute.

Learning Objectives:

After completing this program, attendees will…

  1. Gain an understanding of cavity wall components and construction codes.
  2. Gain an understanding of tolerances and inspection guidelines.
  3. Be able to identify at least three quality control mistakes.
  4. Learn at least four commonly made masonry construction mistakes.

Construction Disasters Symposium 2018

A CSI East Bay / RCI Northern California / AIA East Bay Program

Friday, April 20, 2018
8am-4pm
Cost: Early Bird (before 4/1): $195; After 4/1: $220; After 4/15: $245; Students: $30
Cost includes breakfast and box lunch.
Click here to register.

6 CES HSW LUs

8am- 8:30am: Registration

8:30am- 9:30am
Joe Pinon & Erin Andes, RDH Building Science, Inc.
Learning from Stucco Failures: The Importance of Drainage & How Changes in the Energy
Code are Complicating Stucco Installations

In this presentation, we will explain the building science behind cement plaster and why, due to energy code improvements, it is more difficult for the cement plaster to perform well now than it was in the past. We will use case studies to highlight the significance of controlling water intrusion, air leakage, heat loss, and condensation risk. We will discuss various failure types including cracks, water intrusion, corrosion, and complications caused by continuous insulation. We will also apply the lessons learned and show how to use the concepts of drainage and control layers to improve assemblies and detailing.

9:30am- 10:30am
Chris Nelson, Technical Roof Services
Water Intrusion Damage in a Supercomputer Facility

Damage investigations and subsequent repair recommendations originated from the designers and contractors failure to properly address the detailing and installation challenges, including the inter phase of the roof expansion joints and base of the curtain wall to prevent water intrusion. Furthermore the expected seismic movement was inadequately accommodated and did not provide floor to floor fire protection. The project required extensive interior protection, coordinating with worried computer scientists, cutting and redoing the bottom of the curtain wall, installing a fire blanket lower in the joint, installing a properly shaped and sized expansion joint, providing adequately sized and configured sealant joints, providing functioning weeps, some roof repairs and finally passing the required water tests.

10:30am- 10:55am: Break

10:55am- 11:55am
Dean Larsen & Ivan Chak, Larsen/ Zienkiewicz, Inc.
Lessons Learned in Moisture Related Problems – Three Project Case Studies

The presentation will focus on three separate project case studies where moisture related problems
occurred in the roof, walls, or waterproofing. The first case study involves internal air pressurization, vapor retarder, and air barrier design with respect to roofing and walls. The second case involves hygrothermal performance of an insulated roof on an industrial facility. The third case study reviews exterior expansion joint integration with waterproofing. Each case study will include a review of the failure mechanism, recommendation for repair, and new design.

11:55am- 12:35pm: Lunch Break

12:35pm- 1:35pm
Mike Hilliard, AIA, Hilliard Architects
Accessibility Disasters Will Crush You and Empty Your Errors and Omission Insurance
Policy

Accessibility disasters can crush the lives of alternately enabled people who are denied access to public accommodations or housing. Accessibility disasters will also empty a design professional’s Errors-and omissions insurance policy limits and cost the professional a substantial amount of unpaid time dealing with litigation. The “win-win” solution is for everyone in the construction industry to become aware of the requirements for accessibility so that our built environment becomes more accessible to the alternately enabled. Accessibility regulations and their enforcement are extremely complex. This one hour presentation will give you an understanding of the complexity of both regulations and their enforcement.

1:35pm- 2:35pm
Gary Weaver, Atlas Consulting, Inc.
Death by a Thousand Cuts – Failures in Quality Control and Quality Assurance, Where
Contractors, Owners, and Their Inspectors Don’t Inspect

A review of simple systematic failures on three new construction projects, each valued at more than 50 million dollars and all with disastrous results:
1) Sprayed polyurethane foam and coating.
2) Conventional insulated built-up roofing.
3) Fluid-applied air barriers and metal wall panels.

The specifications on each project failed to provide robust inspection protocols but the Contractors, their Sub- Contractors, and full time compliance with the construction documents, applicable code requirements, manufacturer’s installation independent QA Observers all failed to coordinate in providing guidelines and the industry standards necessary to provide a weather resistant assembly.

2:35pm- 3pm: Break

3pm- 4pm
Phil Dregger, PE, RRC- Pacific Building Consultants
Hurricane Maria – Tips for Investigating Not So Obvious Wind Damage

When a roof covering is hanging off the edge of a building, you don’t need a rocket scientist to tell you that it has been damaged by the wind. But what about a roof that is still in place but has a few holes and funny looking “humps”? Is it wind damaged, and perhaps more importantly how extensive is the wind damage? This presentation will review several roofs in Puerto Rico where wind damage was not so obvious but more extensive than originally thought.

The Program is Sponsored By:

Emerging Contractual Issues in the Design & Construction Industry

a Westcon monthly program

Wednesday, March 21, 2018
6:30pm
Location:
Berkeley Yacht Club, 1 Seawall Drive, Berkeley, CA 94710
Register for this meeting

In this presentation, Construction Practice Leader David Ericksen, Severson & Werson, will address the professional service agreement, alternative delivery models, and employee policies. Under the professional service agreement section, David will cover:

  • Confidentiality
  • Ownership of Work Product
    • Conscience Clauses
    • Assumption of Preliminary Site Information
    • Indemnity (post CA 496 and CDP Coverage)
    • Code Compliance
    • Pass Through Clauses

David will also highlight concerns and risks with corresponding contractual and practice solutions.

2018 Fellows: Emily Marthinsen, FAIA and Laura Hartman, FAIA

Wednesday, March 28, 2018
5:30-7:45pm
Early registration (by March 26): Free AIA Members / employees of chapter member firms; $10 guests. Late registration: $10 AIA Members / employees of chapter member firms; $15 guests
Click here to register.

1.5 CES LUs

Celebrate the achievements of our 2018 Fellows Laura Hartman, FAIA and Emily Marthinsen, FAIA! In addition to a reception, Laura and Emily will present an overview of recent projects.

Click the links below to read the first page of Laura and Emily’s submittals:

Laura Hartman, FAIA

Emily Marthinsen, FAIA