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Posts from the ‘Programs & Events’ Category

Fire and Sound Assemblies: Small Firm Forum

Thursday, July 12, 2018
Noon-1:30pm
Brown Bag Lunch (BYO Lunch)
Free for AIA Members / $3 Guests

1.5 CES LUs

The UL Fire Resistance Directory and the various sound assembly resources tend to intimidate professionals. Focusing on the UL Directory, we hope to make these resources easy to understand and apply while avoiding the common mistakes that have led to litigation.

Fire, Smoke, Heat and Sound Assemblies – Components of a safe and livable environment.
Fire and sound assemblies are like a transmission in your car. If one part is missing or assembled incorrectly, the car won’t run.  The UL manual tends to intimidate professionals and mistakes are made. Focusing primarily on the UL Fire Resistance Manual, this presentation is intended to explain and simplify the selection of fire and sound assemblies and illustrate common mistakes that have led to litigation.

About the Presenter:

Dennis Reilly, Architect/Structural Engineer (President of Reilly & Company & POSTEN Engineering Systems) has designed projects ranging from housing to hospitals and has provided forensic investigation services on projects ranging from housing to justice centers. 

Learning Objectives:

After this presentation, attendees will…

  1.  Have an understanding of the UL Fire Resistance Directory, its organization, components (fire, temperature, smoke, walls, floors, roofs, cladding, penetrations, etc.) and limitations.
  2. Identify at least three common issues related to Sound Assemblies.
  3. Know common mistakes (constructibility, coordination with consultants, application, installation, etc) that have led to litigation.
  4. Removed the intimidation factor in selecting and specifying fire and sound assemblies.

 

Make the Connection 2018 Benefiting Homes For Sonoma

Thursday, July 19, 2018
5-8pm
Location: Autodesk Gallery, 1 Market St #200, San Francisco
Cost: $30 + service fees / $40 day-of
Click here to purchase tickets.

About Homes for Sonoma:

One week after the fires disrupted and destroyed parts of our community a small group of designers, architects, builders and community leaders called a meeting to discuss how to help our friends, families and neighbors. With so many displaced residents in the aftermath of the fires, we felt an urgent need— really a duty—to provide a clear, practical, responsible way to rebuild our community in a way that not only served the immediate needs of those who lost their homes, but would also help address the long-term affordable housing situation in Sonoma County.

Our goal in coming together is to provide leadership and direction in our collective journey to rebuild our homes, our communities, and our lives. By putting our plan into action we can provide affordable, high-quality homes to our neighbors who need housing and build a strategy for longterm needs.

About Make the Connection:

Come mingle and enjoy fabulous food and wine. Find out what these professional associations can do for you!  Join us for a fun introduction to FIVE organizations serving the real estate, interior design,  architectural & construction community, and marketing professions in Northern California.

Each year the proceeds from the Make the Connection event benefit a local 501(c)(3) nonprofit in the Architecture, Engineering or Construction industry.

Presented by AIA-SF, AIA East Bay, SMPS, IIDA-NC, & RECON

Napa Update on Fees and Recovery/Rebuilds

Thursday, June 28, 2018
3-5pm
Free and open to all.
Location: 2751 Napa Valley Corporate Dr, Napa, CA 94558

Click here to RSVP.

Mike Zimmer, Chief Building Official, Planning, Building & Environmental Services for County of Napa, will speak on proposed development fees and provide an update on fire recovery/rebuilds. Time is available for a Q&A session. Please RSVP to info@aiaeb.org for seating counts. 

CSE Meetup

Wednesday, June 20, 2018
6pm
Free and open to all.
Click here to RSVP.

Planning to take the CSE in the next year? Meet up with others who are and set up study groups. Recently licensed architects will be on-hand to share best practices in studying and test-taking. RSVP to info@aiaeb.org

Delivering The Winning Pitch: Making the Business Case for ZNE

Presented by New Buildings Institute and AIA East Bay

Tuesday, June 26, 2018
9am-Noon
Free and open to all.
Click here to register.

The zero net energy (ZNE) process can be daunting! Discover how the spark of an idea can ignite buy-in and fire-up key decision makers in the ZNE process. This three-hour session focuses on the business of creating ZNE in California’s K-12 schools and community college campuses. This interactive workshop will highlight the experiences of districts participating in the Proposition 39 ZNE Schools Pilot program including planning, engaging stakeholders, assessment of costs and savings and options to secure
financing. This session will provide an opportunity for school district staff to hone their key messaging skills to effectively “sell” deep energy efficiency and ZE in their district. Decision makers and operators of these Prop 39 Pilot projects will provide real life examples and case studies to assist in replicating similar projects in your own district. Attendees will have the opportunity to hone their key messaging skills to effectively “sell” deep energy efficiency and ZNE in their district to help build consensus among community members and engage all the necessary audiences.

Who should attend: school administrators, construction and operations managers, business officials, community stakeholders, architects, engineers, contractors, and others interested in high performance design and construction are encouraged to attend.

Certified Access Specialist (CASp) Examination Preparation Course

Tuesday, July 16 – Thursday, July 19, 2018
9am-4pm
Cost: $750. Checks only, no credit cards.

Location: Elihu Harris State Building, 1515 Clay Street, Oakland

To register, please send an email to  support@adapacific.org.
In the email please include the following information:

  • Name
  • Contact information
  • Organization affiliation

This four-day workshop, presented by Pacific ADA Center, will provide a comprehensive review of the relevant knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to successfully pass the examination to become a Certified Access Specialist (CASp) in the state of California. The workshop will provide participants a broad yet detailed synopsis of both state and federal accessibility requirements, as well as an understanding of services rendered by a CASp.

Course benefits:

  • Trainers who know the laws and their importance firsthand.
  • Training in accessibility regulations, standards and codes that will be on the exam, as well as the reasons those regulations, standards and codes exist.
  • Exercises in architectural plans demonstrating accessibility concepts.
  • Sample questions relevant to the open and closed book sections of the exam.
  • AIA credit available for those who sign-in each day, complete the course and receive a certificate of attendance.

If you need an accommodation to participate in the training, please include this information in your registration email. We must receive accommodation requests no later than July 6, 2018.

For more information contact the Pacific ADA Center at 1-800-949-4232 or at email support@adapacific.org / adinfo@adapacific.org

Make the Connection: Call for Sponsors

This year marks the 10th anniversary of the Make the Connection event!

Make the Connection is an annual mixer that brings together 400+ Bay Area professionals from the AEC, real estate, and interior design communities for an evening of conversation and cocktails. This year’s event will be held on July 19th, from 5PM – 8PM and is being organized by: AIASF, AIA East Bay, SMPS, IIDA-NC, IFMA-SF and RECON.

We are asking your firm to sponsor a $500 flat rate donation to support this community event and Homes for Sonoma. Each sponsor will be prominently listed on the website and social media channels, on the invitation, and at the event in July. Additionally, cash sponsors receive two complimentary tickets to the event.

Please click here for more details and to view our Sponsorship Form.

AIASF NEXT Conference

Thursday, May 31 – Friday, June 1, 2018
11am
Early Bird (before May 16): $200 ($150 AIAEB Member/$50 Student Allied) /
After May 16: $225 ($175 AIAEB Member/$50 Student Allied)
Thursday Location: California College of the Arts, 1111 8th Street, San Francisco

Friday Location: San Francisco Art Institute, 800 Chestnut Street, San Francisco
Click here to register.

If attending day one and/or day two of the conference, AIA East Bay members can register using either of the promo codes below:
O Full day conference comp code: NEXTdbl_AIAEB
O Thursday OR Friday comp code: NEXTsgl_AIAEB

How can architects and built-environment professionals leverage the global United Nation’s New Urban Agenda for success and relevance at a local level? The 3rd Annual AIASF Next Conference, May 31 + June 1, will focus on how the Bay Area can take a proactive stance to achieve sustainable and equitable growth.

The 2018 NEXT Conference theme seeks to expand dialogue and engagement around the United Nation’s New Urban Agenda – a bold roadmap to promote sustainable, regenerative, and equitable growth in our cities. The conference will concentrate on taking a proactive stance to prepare a blueprint to achieve a happier and healthier world by 2030. For NEXT, the American Institute of Architects, San Francisco (AIASF)  will gather the best minds in the Bay Area building and design community featuring three tracks: Design, Business and Technology.

MAY 31: PRE-CONFERENCE HOUSING SYMPOSIUM

This year’s Housing Symposium will examine the housing crisis as it relates to three basic principles: public needs and desires, policy rules and incentives, professional responses to these forces. Alternatives beyond what is currently thought possible will also be part of the discussion given the existing conditions of public pressures and policy structure.

JUNE 1: DESIGN, BUSINESS, TECHNOLOGY SESSIONS

Presentations focus on how the Bay Area can advance upon NUA’s outlined standards and principles for the planning, construction, development, management, and improvement of urban areas along its five main pillars of implementation: urban policies, urban legislation and regulations, urban planning and design, local economy and municipal finance, and local implementation.

Hard Hat Tour: Las Positas Multidisciplinary Academic Building

Friday, May 11, 2018
10-11:30am
3000 Campus Hill Dr, Livermore, CA 94551, USA
Cost: $5 AIA Members/$10 Guests   Click here to register

1.5 CES LUs

Mark Shoeman, AIA of HMC Architects, will lead a special hard hat tour of the multidisciplinary academic building at Las Positas College in Livermore. The 43,000sf, $14.5M classroom building is envisioned to redefine classroom buildings on college campuses, and to create much-needed student-centric spaces at Las Positas College.

Organized on two floors around student gathering spaces and sticky spaces are 12 classrooms, 6 labs, and a 100-seat lecture hall. All the public spaces are organized about a central, flexible student space and glass administrative spaces. The building is designed with a LEED Platinum target, with LED lighting, 15 KVa of photovoltaic panels, battery storage system, daylight lighting controls, and rainwater gardens.

About the speaker:

Mark Schoeman, AIA is a talented designer with more than 30 years of experience in all phases of programming, design, and construction documentation for university and college projects. He is passionate about exploring the boundaries of a design problem while seeing creative solutions to client problems, and his work has received numerous awards. Mark was the Principal Designer for Las Positas College Multi-Disciplinary Academic Building 100.

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential/Nonresidential Building Enclosures

Building Science Principles for High Performance Residential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
8:30am-Noon

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary residential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ lowrise residential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to explain which has greater moisture carrying capacity and why: vapor diffusion through materials or air leakage through gaps in the enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a lowrise residential building.

 

Building Science Principles for High Performance Nonresidential Building Enclosures
Wednesday, May 23, 2018
1-4:30pm

Click here to register.
Registration is through PG&E Energy Training Centers, you must create a Training Centers account to register.

3.5 HSW/CES LUs

The building enclosure consists of the physical components that separate interior from exterior. While older buildings may have had thermal performance and comfort issues, the enclosure assemblies were simpler than those found in most contemporary nonresidential buildings. As expectations for energy performance, comfort, and ease of maintenance have increased, thermal insulation and materials with varying moisture permeability have been added to assemblies. Changes in thermal performance can greatly affect moisture management. Given the variety of materials in contemporary wall and roof assemblies, designers and builders need to clearly understand the role and performance of each component.

John Straube, Ph.D., Professor of Architecture and Engineering at the University of Waterloo and Principal in RDH Building Science, will explain building science principles to guide designers and builders in creating high performance wall and roof assembly details that deliver excellent energy performance, improve durability by reducing the likelihood of moisture problems, and improve occupant comfort. Dr. Straube will review high performance details appropriate for low-rise residential buildings. He will discuss how these details reflect an understanding of building science principles related to management of bulk water, thermal transfer, air infiltration, and water vapor.

The 2016 Title 24 Standards for Residential Buildings set stringent u-factor requirements for walls and attics, and u-factor solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for windows, in lowrise residential buildings. While these requirements will help frame discussion, this training isn’t intended as a Title 24 ‘how-to’ class. Knowledge of the principles covered in this training will improve your ability to deliver high performance assemblies even as specific requirements are revised with changing code cycles.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this presentation, attendees will…

  1. Gain the knowledge to list three essential enclosure functions.
  2. Gain the knowledge to list the four control layers that would be found in an ‘ideal’ nonresidential wall or roof assembly.
  3. Be able to describe the mechanism of heat loss from the building interior through a concrete slab that extends continuously beyond the building enclosure.
  4. Be able to define the meaning of the term ‘thermal bridge’ and provide an example in a nonresidential building.

 

About the Presenter:

John Straube, Ph.D., P.Eng., is a Principal at RDH Building Science Inc., where he heads forensic investigations and leads research projects in the areas of low-energy building design, building enclosure performance, hygrothermal analysis, and field monitoring of wall assemblies. He is also a prolific writer, a noted public speaker, and a sought-after “performance coach” who helps other building professionals coordinate their efforts and achieve higher levels of performance in their projects. Over the course of his career, Dr. Straube has also been deeply involved in the areas of building enclosure design and whole building performance, as a consultant, researcher, and educator.